HR Directors – want to be more Director and less HR?

HR Directors – do you want to be more Director and less HR? 

For years now, HR executives have been getting a tough time in the business world. On the one hand, they are frequently told that they need to be strategic and to operate at the top table, and on the other hand, they are lambasted for minor problems with issues such as terms and conditions, contracts, pay or disciplinaries.

 
Human Resources (HR) Directors play a critical role in managing an organisation’s most valuable asset – its employees. However, many HR Directors often find themselves bogged down in day-to-day HR tasks, leaving

little time for strategic initiatives. 

To become more of a director and less focused on HR functions, HR Directors need to adopt a strategic mindset, build strong relationships with other executives, delegate HR functions, develop their leadership style and stay current with the latest HR trends and best practices.

Here’s the thing – CEOs expect you and your team to deliver the core HR processes well, but they don’t care about these processes beyond the fact that they are done. What they really care about is growing the business, taking risks, innovating processes, retaining customers and leveraging technology.

In this blog post, we will explore these strategies in detail and provide actionable tips to help HR Directors become more effective leaders and drive the success of their organisations.

 

How to become more commercial?

To become more of a director and less focused on the day-to-day HR tasks, HR directors should consider the following steps:

  1. Develop a Strategic Mindset: HR directors need to understand the company’s strategic goals and align their HR strategies with those goals. This requires them to be more business-oriented and think beyond just HR
    functions.
  2. Build Strong Relationships: HR directors should build strong relationships with other executives in the organisation, including the CEO, CFO, and other department heads. This can help them gain a deeper understanding of the company’s needs and priorities.
  3. Delegate HR Functions: HR directors should delegate HR functions to their team members, allowing them to focus on strategic initiatives. This also provides an opportunity for team members to develop new skills and take on more responsibilities.
  4. Develop a Leadership Style: HR directors should develop their leadership style, which includes being a good communicator, providing clear direction, and leading by example. This will help them build trust with their team
    members and empower them to take ownership of their work.
  5. Stay Current: HR directors should stay up-to-date with the latest trends and best practices in HR management. This will help them identify opportunities for improvement and make informed decisions about HR policies and procedures.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

We understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organization’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our guide to executive search please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming

Interim Management: The Dynamic Solution To Achieving Breakthrough Results

Interim Management is a dynamic solution to achieving breakthrough results for many companies. In today’s fast-paced business environment, companies are constantly seeking ways to stay ahead of the curve and drive results. One solution that is increasingly gaining traction is interim management.

Interim management is a flexible and results-driven approach to leadership that can help businesses achieve their goals quickly and effectively. By bringing in an experienced interim manager, companies can tap into a wealth of expertise and leadership skills, without the long-term commitment of a permanent hire. In this blog post, we’ll explore the dynamic potential of interim management and how it can help businesses achieve breakthrough results.

Interim management is a type of executive leadership that is designed to help organisations navigate periods of transition, change, or crisis. Interim managers are experienced executives who are hired on a temporary basis to lead an organisation through a specific project or period of change.

In this article, we will provide an in-depth analysis of interim management, including its benefits, challenges, and best practices.

What is Interim Management?

Interim management is a form of executive leadership that involves the temporary appointment of a senior executive to lead an organisation through a period of change, transition, or crisis. Interim managers are typically hired to fill a leadership gap or provide expertise in a specific area.

Interim management can be used in a variety of situations, including:

  • Turnarounds: Interim managers can be brought in to help struggling organisations turn around their performance.
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: Interim managers can help integrate two organisations following a merger or acquisition.
  • Succession Planning: Interim managers can be used to bridge the gap between a departing executive and their successor.
  • Crisis Management: Interim managers can be used to lead an organisation through a crisis, such as a cyberattack, natural disaster, or scandal.

Benefits of Interim Management

Interim management offers several benefits to organisations, including:

  • Expertise: Interim managers are highly experienced executives who bring a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the organisation.
  • Flexibility: Interim management provides organisations with the flexibility to quickly bring in leadership expertise on a temporary basis.
  • Objectivity: Interim managers are typically brought in from outside the organisation, which allows them to provide an objective perspective on the organisation’s challenges and opportunities.
  • Results-oriented: Interim managers are focused on delivering results within a specific timeframe, which can help ensure that the organisation makes progress towards its goals.

Challenges of Interim Management

While interim management offers several benefits, it also presents some challenges, including:

  • Integration: Interim managers are typically brought in from outside the organisation, which can make it challenging to integrate them into the existing culture and team.
  • Cost: Interim management can be expensive, particularly for small or mid-sized organisations.
  • Time constraints: Interim managers are typically hired for a specific period of time, which can create pressure to deliver results quickly.

Best Practices for Interim Management

To ensure the success of interim management engagements, organisations should follow some best practices, including:

  • Define the scope of the engagement: Organisations should clearly define the scope of the interim management engagement, including the specific goals and deliverables.
  • Provide support: Organisations should provide the interim manager with the resources and support they need to be successful, including access to information, staff, and technology.
  • Communicate effectively: Communication is critical in interim management engagements. Organisations should ensure that there is clear communication between the interim manager, the organisation’s leadership team, and staff.
  • Manage expectations: Interim managers are typically hired to deliver results quickly. Organisations should manage expectations to ensure that the interim manager has the time and resources they need to be successful.

How to become an Interim Manager?

To become an interim manager, there are several steps you can take, we have also written some advice how to to progress your interim career:

  1. Build a strong track record of success: Interim management is a highly competitive field, and clients are looking for experienced executives who can deliver results quickly. Building a strong track record of success in your field can help you stand out from other candidates.
  2. Develop a broad range of skills: Interim managers are expected to be highly skilled in their areas of expertise, but they should also have a broad range of skills that allow them to adapt to different organizations and situations. Developing skills in areas such as change management, leadership, and project management can help you become a more effective interim manager.
  3. Build a strong network: Networking is key in the interim management field. Building relationships with other executives, consultants, and recruiters can help you stay up to date on the latest opportunities and trends.
  4. Consider taking interim management courses or certifications: There are several courses and certifications available that can help you develop the skills and knowledge needed to become an effective interim manager. These include courses in project management, change management, and leadership, as well as certifications from organizations such as the Institute of Interim Management.
  5. Work with an interim management agency: Interim management agencies can help you find opportunities and connect with clients. Working with an agency can also provide you with access to training, resources, and support that can help you succeed as an interim manager.

In summary, to become an interim manager, you should focus on building a strong track record of success, developing a broad range of skills, building a strong network, considering taking courses or certifications, and working with an interim management agency.

How do you ensure that your interim manager is successful?

There are several steps that you can take to ensure that your interim manager is successful:

  1. Clearly define the scope of the project: Before bringing in an interim manager, it’s important to define the scope of the project and the outcomes that you expect. This can help the interim manager focus on what needs to be achieved and provide a clear understanding of what success looks like.
  2. Set clear expectations: It’s important to set clear expectations with your interim manager from the outset. This includes expectations around communication, reporting, deliverables, and timelines.
  3. Provide support and resources: Interim managers are brought in to deliver results quickly, but they still need the support and resources to do their job effectively. This can include access to key stakeholders, budget, and IT systems.
  4. Ensure alignment with the company culture: Interim managers are often required to work within a specific company culture. It’s important to ensure that the interim manager is aligned with the culture and values of the company to ensure a smooth integration.
  5. Monitor progress: Regular monitoring of the interim manager’s progress is essential to ensure that they are on track to achieve the desired outcomes. This can include regular check-ins, reporting, and feedback.
  6. Provide feedback and recognition: Providing regular feedback and recognition to the interim manager can help them to stay motivated and focused on delivering results. This can include recognition for achievements and feedback on areas where they can improve.

In summary, to ensure that your interim manager is successful, it’s important to clearly define the project scope, set clear expectations, provide support and resources, ensure alignment with company culture, monitor progress, and provide feedback and recognition.

Conclusion

Interim management is a valuable tool that can help organisations navigate periods of change, transition, or crisis.

Interim managers are highly experienced executives who provide organisations with expertise, flexibility, objectivity, and a results-oriented approach. While interim management presents some challenges, organisations can ensure success by following best practices, defining the scope of the engagement, providing support, communicating effectively, and managing expectations.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

We understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organization’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Creating a People Experience Function: How to Improve Employee Engagement and Drive Business Success

A lot of clients I am talking to are thinking of creating a people experience function… but what is it? And should you consider one for yourself?

People Experience (PX), is the sum of all interactions that employees have with an organisation. It encompasses everything from the recruiting process to onboarding, training and development, performance management, and offboarding. A positive PX can lead to higher employee engagement, better retention, and increased productivity.

The different between People Experience (or Employee Experience) and Engagement, is that engagement is what can typically be measured as an outcome of the experience people have had within an organisation.

Here we dive in to the potential benefits of creating a PX team and explore some of the companies that have done this successfully.

The Business Case for Creating a People Experience Function:

A strong people experience function can help the company attract and retain top talent, improve customer satisfaction, and increase overall productivity. By investing in the employee experience, the company can create a positive culture that attracts and retains high-performing employees.

Overview:

In today’s competitive business environment, companies need to focus on creating a positive and engaging employee experience to attract and retain top talent. By creating a PX function, your company can really focus on improving employee engagement, increase retention rates, and drive overall business success.

Objectives:

  • Improve employee engagement and satisfaction
  • Increase retention rates
  • Enhance the overall quality of the employee experience
  • Drive business success through increased productivity, innovation, and customer satisfaction

Potential problems

If your company is currently experiencing high turnover rates and low employee engagement scores. This is negatively impacting productivity, innovation, and customer satisfaction.

Additionally, in order to remain competitive and to drive business success, your company needs to focus on creating a positive and engaging employee experience.

Proposed Solution:

By creating a dedicated People Experience (PX) function, your company can focus on designing and delivering an engaging experience for employees across the entire employee lifecycle.

The PX function will be responsible for a range of activities, including onboarding, training, ongoing support, and community building. Further more, the function will also leverage data and feedback from employees to continuously improve and refine the employee experience.

Expected Benefits:

  • Improved employee engagement and satisfaction: By creating a more engaging and positive employee experience, your company can improve employee engagement and satisfaction, which will lead to higher productivity, innovation, and customer satisfaction.
  • Increased retention rates: By creating a more engaging and positive employee experience, your company can increase retention rates and reduce turnover costs.
  • Enhanced overall quality of the employee experience: By focusing on the employee experience, your company can create a more positive and supportive work environment, which will enhance the overall quality of the employee experience.
  • Drive business success: By improving employee engagement, satisfaction, and retention rates, your company can drive business success through increased productivity, innovation, and customer satisfaction.

Costs:

The costs of creating a PX function will depend on the size and scope of the function. Key cost considerations include:

  • Hiring and training PX team members
  • Developing and implementing PX initiatives and programs
  • Investing in technology and tools to support PX initiatives

Return on Investment:

The return on investment (ROI) of creating a PX function will depend on the specific goals and objectives of your company. Some potential ROI metrics include:

  • Increased employee engagement and satisfaction scores
  • Reduced turnover rates and costs
  • Increased productivity, innovation, and customer satisfaction
  • Improved overall business performance and profitability

Examples of businesses that have done this successfully:

  • Sony Music Entertainment: in 2022 Sony Music announced they were moving to a PX Model “we are reimagining the role Human Resources has served and will play in our business. Sony Music Entertainment is there for every step of our artists’ creative journey—and our People Experience teams do the same thing for our employees at work”
  • Cisco: Cisco has a PX function that is focused on delivering a positive experience for employees across the entire employee lifecycle. The team uses a range of tools and techniques, including design thinking and user research, to identify areas for improvement and develop solutions that meet the needs of employees. Through its PX initiatives, Cisco has been able to improve employee engagement, reduce turnover rates, and enhance the overall quality of the employee experience.
  • HubSpot: HubSpot has a dedicated Employee Experience team that focuses on creating a positive experience for employees and customers alike. The team is responsible for a range of activities, including onboarding, training, and ongoing support. Through its PX initiatives, HubSpot has been able to increase employee engagement, improve customer satisfaction, and drive overall business success.

How might I approach creating a PX product?

  • Define the problem and objectives: The first step in creating a PX product is to clearly define the problem that you are trying to solve and the objectives that you hope to achieve. This might involve conducting research and gathering data on employee engagement, turnover rates, and other key metrics. You should also identify any pain points or challenges that employees are facing in their day-to-day work.
  • Conduct user research: To create a successful PX product, you need to understand the needs, preferences, and behaviours of your target audience. This might involve conducting focus groups, surveys, or interviews with employees to gather feedback and insights.
  • Develop a prototype: Once you have a clear understanding of the problem and user needs, you can begin to develop a prototype of your PX product. This might involve creating wireframes, mock-ups, or a minimum viable product (MVP) that you can test with a small group of users.
  • Test and iterate: After developing your prototype, you should test it with a group of users to gather feedback and identify areas for improvement. Use this feedback to iterate on your product and refine it until it meets the needs of your target audience.
  • Launch and measure success: Once you have a final version of your PX product, you can launch it to a wider audience and measure its success using key metrics such as engagement, retention, and productivity. Use this data to continuously improve and refine your PX product over time.
  • Monitor and adapt: The final step in creating a successful PX product is to continuously monitor and adapt to changing user needs and preferences. Keep gathering feedback and data, and use this information to make ongoing improvements to your product to ensure that it remains relevant and effective.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, we believe that by creating a dedicated PX function, you can improve employee engagement, increase retention rates, and drive overall business success. While there are costs associated with this, the potential benefits and ROI make it a worthwhile investment.

Our focus on long-term partnerships

At re:find Executive Search we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. By building long-term relationships with our clients, we help them to find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

Every organisation is unique and we feel that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. re:find offer bespoke recruitment solutions, that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We commit to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills needed for each campaign.

For more information please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Putting People First: How Renaming HR Is Improving Company Culture

If you’re a Chief People Officer or just someone interested in HR, you may have noticed a trend of companies using the term “People” instead of “HR” to describe their HR department. But is this just a trendy new name, or is there something deeper going on here? Let’s dive into the pros and cons of calling HR “People”.

The human resources department is an essential part of any organisation, responsible for managing the workforce and ensuring that employees are satisfied and productive. However, the terminology used to describe this department has been a matter of debate for some time.

Background

The term “human resources” has been in use for several decades and has become widely accepted as a way of describing the department responsible for managing a companies workforce. However, some have argued that the term can be dehumanising and reduces employees to the status of a resource or commodity.

In contrast, the term “People” is seen as more inclusive and humanising, acknowledging the unique needs and aspirations of the individual employees.

Arguments for “HR”

One of the primary arguments in favour of using “HR” is that it is a well-established term that is widely recognised in the business world.

According to data from Google Trends, searches for the term “HR” have been consistently higher than searches for “People” over the past five years, indicating that the term is more commonly used and understood.

Another argument for “HR” is that it accurately reflects the department’s role in managing the workforce as a resource. This can be especially important in industries such as retail, manufacturing or construction, where labour is a critical input and needs to be managed efficiently to ensure productivity.

According to a survey of HR professionals conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 62% of respondents felt that the term “HR” accurately reflected their department’s role in managing human capital.

Finally, a number of people argue that “HR” is a more professional-sounding term that may help to establish the department’s credibility and authority within the organisation. This can be important when dealing with senior management or other stakeholders who may be sceptical of the department’s role or importance.

According to a survey of HR professionals conducted by the HR Certification Institute (HRCI), 82% of respondents felt that the term “HR” conveyed a sense of professionalism and expertise.

Arguments for “People”

One of the main arguments in favour of using “People” is that it is a more inclusive term that acknowledges the individuality of employees.

According to a survey conducted by the software company BambooHR, 70% of employees felt that the term “People” was more humanising than “HR.”

Another argument for “People” is that it is less objectifying than “HR” and may help to create a more collaborative and cooperative relationship between the department and employees.

According to a survey conducted by the consulting firm Deloitte, 73% of employees felt that the term “People” conveyed a sense of partnership and collaboration.

By the same token, a final argument for “People” is that it reflects the changing nature of work and the role of employees in the organisation. As more companies embrace flexible work arrangements and remote work, the role of the HR department is evolving to focus more on supporting the needs and aspirations of individual employees.

According to a survey conducted by the consulting firm McKinsey & Company, 67% of employees felt that the term “People” was more aligned with their own values and priorities than “HR.”

Our opinion

Based on the data presented and out own personal experiences, we recommend using the term “People” to describe the HR department.

While “HR” may be more well-established and specific, we believe that “People” better reflects the changing nature of work and the importance of creating a supportive and inclusive culture.

Our focus on long-term partnerships

At re:find Executive Search we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. By building long-term relationships with our clients, we help them to find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

Every organisation is unique. We feel that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment.

re:find offer bespoke recruitment solutions, that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We commit to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills needed for each campaign.

For more information please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Unlocking The Secrets Of Strategic Organisational Design For Business Leaders

Org design is super important for business leaders if you want your company to do well, in this article we talk about unlocking the secrets of strategic org design and share them with you. It’s all about making sure your structure, processes, systems, and culture all work together to help you achieve your goals.

Nowadays, companies that innovate do well, and businesses need to be able to keep up.

To do that, you need to have a good plan for your organisational design that fits with what you’re trying to do and what the competition is up to.

By learning about the best ways to design your organisation, you can make smart choices that will help you succeed and make everyone happy.

In this piece, we’ll talk about the most important things you need to know to design your organisation well, and give you loads of tips and ideas to help you get it right.

If you’re a CEO, HR person, or consultant, or someone looking to develop in the Org Design space this should be for you!

What is Organisational Design

Organisational design refers to the process of structuring an organisation’s systems, processes, roles, and responsibilities to achieve its goals and objectives effectively. It involves analysing an organisation’s current structure, identifying any gaps or inefficiencies, and developing a new structure or plan to optimise performance.

Organisational design typically includes determining the organisation’s hierarchy, identifying reporting relationships, defining roles and responsibilities, establishing communication and decision-making processes, and aligning resources and systems to support the organisation’s objectives. The goal is to create a structure that supports the organisation’s strategy and enables it to achieve its goals efficiently and effectively. Organisational design is often an iterative process that involves ongoing evaluation and adjustment to ensure that the organisation remains aligned with its objectives and adapts to changes in the environment.

How is org design related to organisational development?

Organisational design and organisational development are closely related concepts, as both aim to improve the performance of an organisation. However, they differ in their approach and focus.

Organisational design focuses on the structural aspects of an organisation, such as its hierarchy, roles, and reporting relationships. Its goal is to create a structure that supports the organisation’s strategy and enables it to achieve its objectives efficiently and effectively.

On the other hand, organisational development (OD) focuses on the people and culture of an organisation. OD aims to improve the effectiveness of the organisation by enhancing its culture, leadership, communication, and collaboration. It involves interventions that target the human side of the organisation to improve performance.

Organisational design and organisational development often go hand-in-hand. For example, if an organisation is implementing a new strategy, it may need to restructure its hierarchy and roles to align with the new direction.

At the same time, it may also need to work on improving its culture and leadership to ensure that the new structure is effective. Therefore, organisational design and organisational development are often used together to create a holistic approach to improving an organisation’s performance.

How can org design fit in to an overall hr transformation programme?

Organisational design can play a crucial role in an overall HR transformation program. HR transformation typically involves changing the way an organisation manages its human resources to improve its performance and create value.

Organisational design is an essential component of this process, as it can help align the organisation’s structure, roles, and processes with its HR strategy.

Here are some ways that organisational design can fit into an overall HR transformation program:

  • Aligning structure with strategy: Organisational design can help align the structure of the organisation with its HR strategy. For example, if the organisation’s strategy is to focus on innovation, the structure should be designed to facilitate collaboration and knowledge sharing.
  • Streamlining processes: Organisational design can help streamline HR processes, such as recruitment, performance management, and talent development. By designing efficient processes that eliminate redundancies and improve communication, HR can be more effective in achieving its objectives.
  • Redefining roles and responsibilities: Organisational design can help redefine roles and responsibilities to align with the organisation’s HR strategy. This can include creating new roles, eliminating redundant roles, or merging roles to create more efficient and effective HR functions.
  • Implementing new HR technologies: Organisational design can also help facilitate the implementation of new HR technologies, such as HR information systems, talent management software, and e-learning platforms. By designing a structure that supports the use of these technologies, HR can more effectively leverage them to achieve its objectives.

Here are some of the challenges organisations face with regards to poor organisational design:

  1. Overlapping roles and responsibilities: When there are multiple individuals or departments responsible for the same function or task, it can lead to confusion, duplication of efforts, and inefficiencies.
  2. Hierarchies that are too complex: When an organisation has too many layers of management or too many reporting lines, decision-making can become slow and bureaucratic. This can lead to delays, missed opportunities, and a lack of agility.
  3. Siloed departments: When departments or teams work in isolation, it can result in poor communication, lack of collaboration, and a lack of knowledge-sharing. This can lead to missed opportunities and hinder innovation.
  4. Lack of alignment with strategy: When an organisation’s structure, roles, and processes are not aligned with its strategic objectives, it can lead to confusion and a lack of focus. This can make it difficult to achieve the organisation’s goals and objectives.
  5. Inefficient workflows: When workflows are poorly designed or not optimised, it can lead to bottlenecks, delays, and missed deadlines. This can negatively impact the organisation’s performance and lead to frustration among employees.
  6. Poor communication: When communication channels are unclear or ineffective, it can lead to misunderstandings, missed deadlines, and a lack of coordination. This can negatively impact productivity and the quality of work.

Which companies have suffered from poor strategic org design?

  1. Enron: Enron was an energy company that collapsed in 2001 due to a range of factors, including poor organisational design. The company had a complex structure with multiple subsidiaries, which made it difficult to understand the company’s finances. Additionally, the company had a culture of excessive risk-taking and unethical behaviour, which ultimately led to its downfall.
  2. Blockbuster: Blockbuster was a video rental company that was once a dominant player in the industry. However, the company failed to adapt to changing consumer behaviour, such as the rise of streaming services like Netflix. Blockbuster’s organisational design was slow to respond to changes in the industry, which ultimately led to its decline.
  3. Kodak: Kodak was a leader in the photography industry for many years, but the company struggled to adapt to the rise of digital photography. Kodak’s organisational design was slow to respond to changes in the industry, which ultimately led to its decline.

How can a company think strategically about org design?

The first step is to define the company’s strategy, which should include the mission, vision, values, and goals. As well as the competitive landscape and market trends.

The strategy should be communicated throughout the organisation, so that everyone understands the direction in which the company is headed.

To think strategically about organisational design, a company can take the following steps:

  1. Analyse the current organisational structure: The next step is to analyse the company’s current organisational structure, including roles and responsibilities, reporting lines, and decision-making processes. This analysis can help identify areas of inefficiency, duplication of effort, or misalignment with the business strategy.
  2. Define the desired outcomes: Based on the analysis, the company can define the desired outcomes of the organisational design process. This includes identifying the key objectives, such as improving efficiency, increasing agility, or enhancing collaboration.
  3. Develop a plan: With the desired outcomes in mind, the company can develop a plan for the organisational design process. This includes defining the new structure, roles, and responsibilities, as well as the process for implementing the changes.
  4. Communicate the changes: It is important to communicate the changes to all stakeholders, including employees, customers, and partners. This can help ensure that everyone understands the rationale for the changes and is aligned with the new organisational structure.
  5. Monitor and adjust: Finally, the company should monitor the effectiveness of the new organisational design and make adjustments as needed. This includes tracking key performance metrics, soliciting feedback from employees and customers, and making changes to the structure or processes as needed.

How can I develop my career in to specialising in org design?

Developing a career in organisational design can be a rewarding and challenging path. Here are some steps you can take to specialise in organisational design:

  1. Gain education and training: Pursuing a degree in organisational design, organisational development, or a related field can provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge and skills.
  2. Get hands-on experience: Seek out opportunities to gain practical experience in organisational design. This can include internships, volunteer work, or positions in HR, consulting, or related fields.
  3. Build a network: Networking is an essential component of any career. Attend industry events, join professional organisations, and connect with experts in the field to build relationships and gain insights.
  4. Develop key skills: Successful organisational designers typically have a combination of skills, including strategic thinking, problem-solving, communication, and project management. Continuously developing and honing these skills can help you succeed in this field.
  5. Stay up-to-date: Organisational design is a constantly evolving field, and it is essential to stay up-to-date on the latest trends and best practices. Read industry publications, attend conferences and webinars, and participate in professional development opportunities.
  6. Consider certification: Earning a certification in organisational design or a related field can demonstrate your expertise and commitment to the profession. Examples include the Diploma in Organisational Development and the business schools such as Henley and Roffey Park both offer specific Org Design certifications.

What is the potential career path as an organisation design professional?

  • Entry-level positions: Entry-level positions in organisational design may include roles such as organisational development coordinator or analyst. These positions typically involve supporting more senior team members in conducting research, analysing data, and developing recommendations for organisational design changes.
  • Mid-level positions: Mid-level positions in organisational design may include roles such as organisational design manager or consultant. These positions typically involve leading projects to develop and implement new organisational structures, processes, and systems. Mid-level professionals may also be responsible for managing project teams and collaborating with other departments and stakeholders.
  • Senior-level positions: Senior-level positions in organisational design may include roles such as chief organisational design officer or executive director of organisational effectiveness. These positions typically involve leading the design and implementation of organisational strategies, and providing guidance and support to other departments and leaders. Senior-level professionals may also be responsible for developing and managing budgets, overseeing multiple projects, and providing strategic advice to the executive team.
  • Independent consultant: Experienced organisational design professionals may choose to work as independent consultants. This may involve working with multiple clients, developing customised solutions to meet their needs, and managing their own business operations.

Which consulting firms provide organisation design services?

  • McKinsey & Company: McKinsey & Company is a global management consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisational and business model transformation practice.
  • Bain & Company: Bain & Company is a global management consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisation practice.
  • Boston Consulting Group (BCG): BCG is a global management consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisational transformation practice.
  • Deloitte: Deloitte is a global consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its human capital practice.
  • Korn Ferry: Korn Ferry is a global organisational consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisational strategy practice.
  • PwC: PwC is a global professional services firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisational effectiveness practice.
  • Accenture: Accenture is a global consulting firm that offers organisational design services as part of its organisation and talent practice.

There are also many smaller specialist boutique consultancies based in the UK that offer organisational design services. Some examples include:

  • Q5 is an organisational design consultancy. It is a global management consulting firm that specialises in organisational strategy, design, and transformation.
  • LACE Partners: LACE Partners was founded by Aaron Alburey and Cathy Acratopulo, who wanted to create a business that could provide a full-service consultancy for HR professionals.  
  • On the Mark: OTM is a leader in collaborative organisation design and operating model modernisations.
  • Chaucer: Chaucer is a London-based consultancy that specialises in organisational design, change management, and program management.

Here are some top tips to effectively land an organisational design project:

  • Understand the client’s needs: Before pitching an org design project, it’s important to understand the client’s specific needs, goals, and challenges. Conduct research on the organisation, its industry, and its competitive landscape, and use this information to tailor your proposal to the client’s specific situation.
  • Develop a clear value proposition: In your proposal, clearly articulate the value proposition of your organisational design services and explain how they will help the client achieve their objectives. Use case studies or examples of previous successful projects to illustrate the benefits of your approach.
  • Demonstrate expertise and experience: To build credibility with the client, demonstrate your expertise and experience in organisational design. Highlight your qualifications, certifications, and relevant experience, and provide references from previous clients or colleagues who can attest to your skills and capabilities.
  • Build a strong project team: Organisational design projects require a multidisciplinary team with expertise in areas such as change management, human resources, and technology. Assemble a strong project team with a range of skills and experiences, and clearly outline the roles and responsibilities of each team member in your proposal.
  • Develop a detailed project plan: In your proposal, develop a detailed project plan that outlines the scope of the project, the timeline, and the deliverables. Be sure to include regular check-ins and progress reports to ensure that the project stays on track and that the client’s needs are met.
  • Communicate regularly with the client: Throughout the project, maintain regular communication so they are updated on progress. Being responsive and proactive in your communication can help build trust and strengthen the client relationship.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS


At re:find Executive Search we are specialists in HR transformation. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. By building long-term relationships with our clients, we help them to find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

Every organisation is unique and we feel that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. re:find offer bespoke recruitment solutions, that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We commit to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills needed for each campaign.

For more information please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Charting Your Course To Becoming a Chief People Officer: The Exact Skills You Need to Become a Successful CPO

The career path to becoming a Chief People Officer (CPO), Chief HR Officer (CHRO) or Group HRD is a career goal that requires a combination of experience, education, and skill development. CPOs typically form part of the executive leadership team of a business, with a broad commercial role to play, as well, as a specialist area of expertise.

Chief People Officers are also responsible for managing all aspects of human resources within an organisation, including talent acquisition, employee engagement, retention, training and development, performance management, and compensation and benefits.

Gain the relevant experience:

To become a CPO, you need to have extensive experience in human resources or people operations. This can be gained through a variety of positions such as senior HR Generalist roles, Head of Talent, Head of OD, or Head of HR operations.

As I reflect on the candidates who have swiftly progressed in their careers. It is evident that those who have a good breadth of experience get there the quickest, this is typically by taking rotational roles in to an area of expertise such as Reward or Talent Management.

Advice: Start by building a strong foundation in HR, take on challenging roles that offer exposure to different aspects of the HR function. Seek out opportunities to lead cross-functional projects that give you a broader view of the business.

Here are some other experience areas to consider developing as part of your career path to Chief HR Officer or Chief People Officer:
Business acumen:

A CPO must have a deep understanding of the business they are working in, including its strategy, operations, financials, and industry. This understanding enables the CPO to develop HR strategies that are aligned with the business goals and contribute to the organisation’s success.

Advice: Seek out opportunities to learn about the business by attending leadership meetings, working closely with business leaders, and participating in cross-functional projects.

Talent management:

A CPO must have a strong background in talent management, including recruiting, developing, and retaining top talent. This involves creating effective recruiting strategies, developing training and development programs, and implementing performance management systems.

Advice: Take on projects that focus on improving the talent management function within your organisation. Consider developing new programs to attract and retain top talent, such as employee referral programs or leadership development programs.

Employee engagement:

A CPO must have a deep understanding of employee engagement and be able to develop programs that promote a positive workplace culture. This includes creating programs that improve employee morale, increase employee satisfaction, and reduce turnover.

Advice: Take on projects that focus on improving employee engagement, such as developing employee recognition programs or employee surveys to gather relevant feedback and data points that can influence senior leadership within your business.

Change management:

A CPO must have experience in change management, including the ability to lead and manage change initiatives effectively. This involves developing communication plans, assessing the impact of change on employees, and implementing change management best practices.

Advice: Seek out opportunities to lead change initiatives within your organisation. Consider developing a change management plan for a new initiative or leading a cross-functional team to implement a new HR program.

Data analysis:

A CPO must have a strong background in data analysis, including the ability to analyse HR metrics and use data to make informed decisions. By developing HR metrics, workforce trends, and using data to identify areas for improvement.

Advice: Develop your data analysis skills by taking courses or attending workshops on data analytics. Use can use HR analytics tools to analyse HR metrics within your organisation; such as turnover rates, employee engagement scores, or training and development ROI.

Education:

Although it is not a perquisite, most CPO’s I know have a CIPD qualification, a degree in HR, Business Administration, or a related field is typically as the minimum requirement for most HR roles in the UK.

However, to become a CPO, you may need to pursue advanced education such as a Master’s degree in HR, MBA or a related field. An advanced degree provides the knowledge and skills needed to develop HR strategies that align with the business goals.

Advice: Pursue a relevant degree or certification that aligns with your career goals such as an MBA, a Master’s degree in HR, or CIPD.

Develop your leadership skills:

As a CPO, you will be responsible for leading a team of HR professionals and influencing the organisation’s leadership team. Developing leadership skills is crucial to becoming a CPO. This includes the ability to communicate effectively, inspire and motivate others, and lead with empathy and emotional intelligence.

Advice: Look for opportunities to lead teams or projects, attend leadership development programs or conferences. It is important to seek out external guidance either in the form of mentorship from experienced HR leaders or finding a professional coach.

The HR market is constantly changing, and staying informed about industry trends is essential to being a successful CPO. This includes keeping up with changes in employment laws, emerging technologies, and evolving best practices in talent management.

Advice: Join professional HR organisations, attend industry conferences, and read industry publications and blogs.

Build a strong network:

Building a strong network of professional contacts is important in HR. This includes building relationships with other HR professionals, industry experts, and business leaders.

Advice: Attend networking events, join HR-related groups on LinkedIn, and seek out coaching from experienced HR leaders.

  1. Access to Opportunities: Networking opens doors to various opportunities that may not be advertised. Many senior positions, including CPO roles, are often filled through referrals and personal connections. Being well-connected in the industry increases your chances of hearing about these opportunities and being recommended for them.
  2. Knowledge and Learning: Through networking, you can gain valuable insights, information, and knowledge from experienced professionals and industry leaders. This can help you stay updated on the latest trends.
  3. Mentorship and Guidance: Building relationships with senior HR leaders can provide you with support as you progress in your career. Learning from their experiences and receiving advice can be helpful in your journey towards becoming a CPO.
  4. Influence and Collaboration: A strong network allows you to collaborate with other people in your industry. As you climb the corporate ladder, its important to have a strong support system. As well as having people who respect your opinion and who can be advocates for your career growth.
  5. Building Trust and Credibility: Networking allows you to show your skills, knowledge, and achievements to a wider audience. As people get to know you and your work, it helps build trust and credibility, which are vital traits for a CPO who needs to gain buy-in from employees and senior management alike.
  6. Opportunities for Personal Development: Engaging with diverse professionals through networking can expose you to different perspectives, cultures, and leadership styles. This exposure can aid in your personal development and make you a well-rounded HR leader.

How to build a strong network of professional contacts:

  1. Attend Industry Events: Participate in conferences, events, workshops, and HR-related events where you can meet with like-minded professionals.
  2. Join Professional Associations: Become a member of HR-related associations. These groups offer networking events and opportunities to connect with HR leaders.
  3. Utilize Social Media: Platforms like LinkedIn can be powerful tools for expanding your professional network. Connect with colleagues, attend virtual networking events, and engage in discussions and industry groups.
  4. Attend Informal Gatherings: This can be an excellent way to meet people in a more relaxed setting and to form relationships.
  5. Provide Value: Networking is a two-way street. Be willing to offer assistance, share knowledge, and help others in your network. Building genuine relationships based on mutual respect is crucial.
  6. Maintain Relationships: Building a network is not a one-time event. It requires consistent effort and nurturing. Stay in touch with your contacts, congratulate them on their achievements, and be genuinely interested in their success.

Remember that networking is about building meaningful connections, not just collecting business cards. Invest time and effort in fostering authentic relationships…

Over time, your network will become a valuable asset in your journey to becoming a successful CPO.

Our view:

The path to becoming a CPO is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires a blend of experience, education, and skill development. Aspiring HR leaders must build a strong foundation in human resources.

By taking on diverse and challenging roles that provide exposure to various aspects of the HR function.

Staying informed about industry trends and by building a strong network of professional contacts, HR professionals gain access to various opportunities, mentorship, and valuable insights that contribute to their personal and career growth.

Our focus on long-term partnerships

At re:find Executive Search we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. By building long-term relationships with our clients, we help them to find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

Every organisation is unique. We feel that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment.

re:find offer bespoke recruitment solutions, that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We commit to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills needed for each campaign.

For more information please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.