Introducing the newest member of our team

 

We’d like to introduce you all to the newest member of the re:find team: meet Carly O’Connell, our Interim and Executive search specialist.

 

Carly has been working within the HR space for over 12 years. Many of those years focused on partnering clients in their search for exceptional contractors, who can deliver on HR and business transformation projects.

“I operate in a consultative manner and will challenge your requirements, to ensure all solutions are considered. I pride myself on understanding both my client and my candidate equally and delivering the brief in an honest and fun way.”

 

So, Carly, why re:find?

re:find have offered me the opportunity to work with a team who share my values: being honest and helpful, as well as looking at securing long-term genuine relationships, not just short-term wins.

The team at re:find are all experienced in their respective fields and I have spent several years learning about them as recruiters from those in our shared network. I was excited to join the team after hearing such good things about them. Knowing how credible they are, it made sense to me to join and collaborate.

As a seasoned HR recruiter, I know that cultural fit is hugely important. I have operated in many industry sectors and the best results come from matching the person to the culture not just the cv to a tick list.  By really getting to know the person behind the cv and taking the time to allow candidates to get to know me all helps in building a partnership based on honesty.

 

What is it like being a part of team re:find?

On first impressions, re:find are actually what they said they were in my interview process, knowledgeable, creative, credible and fun. This is not the usual stuffy status quo search firm. They allow nuance and obscure requests to be the “norm” and enable people to be genuine and honest to ensure they can truly match a brief.  They have a transparency that invites both candidates and clients to visualise the process of a brief and this is also reflected in the transparency the team give to each other’s campaigns and movements. I have found this to allow real flexible working with my wellbeing and professional needs being considered and met.

I have been pleasantly surprised by the amount of resource that is given to the team to ensure we have an exceptional reach to the very best candidates both on and off the market.

The approach is different: you won’t see us shouting about our vacancies online, or spending hours sifting through job boards. What we do is we establish genuine, long-standing relationships with clients who value us and work in partnership with us, rather than having what is simply a transactional relationship with them.

 

For all thing’s interim management, change and transformation email me on carly@refind.co.uk.

You can ‘goal’ your own way…achieving business goals

Achieving business goals

Achieving goals, whether they’re personal or professional, can be tough. We’ve all got our own personal mountain tops. The goals that we set ourselves that, from the outset, seem nearly impossible to conquer…

I read a book called ‘The One Thing’ by Gary Keller. The premise is: what is the ‘one thing’ that you need to do that will subsequently make everything else fall into place and become easier?

In the book, Keller talks about breaking down your goals into long and short term, and how by doing this you can turn them into more manageable and less intimidating tasks.

Once you’ve broken them down, you can then consistently ask yourself questions about your progress to keep you on track with your overall goal.

The process

This process works in two parts. The first is about finding the right direction, and the second part is about chasing the right action.

For the first part, think about the big picture and identify what your overall goal is, what is the one thing that you want to do or achieve. This can be anything from your career goals to a personal ambition that you have.

The second part of this process is more short-term and practical. You have to ask yourself questions that provide you with a small focus on what you can do right now to help you get to where you want. For example, making that phone call that you’ve been putting off, or signing up for that networking event that you find intimidating.

Stay on track

By repeatedly asking yourself these more focused and short-term questions, you will not only keep on target to your overall goal, but you will also find yourself taking actionable steps that all build on one another and provide you with the momentum to finally reach your mountaintop!

To have a chat about your goals or your executive search, contact me at carl@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about Carl Hinett our Executive search of HR professional’s specialist here.

Want to hear more about our senior HR professionals golf society? Sign up here.

Career progression as an interim

I asked my network if they thought interim professionals could focus on their own development or if they were dictated by what was out there on the market and got a number of thoughts and opinions back…

A concern of many individuals in permanent employment is the perceived lack of career progression as a contractor. Some think that if you move into interim employment, you stay in that one position for the rest of your working life.

Sarah Cowley, Executive Coach, said, “Managing one’s career takes courage, and the confidence to say no… A successful career is dependent on personal growth which in turn results from spending time and money on learning.”

A key difference of the employment status of an interim (becoming a LTD company) is the mentality of not just being one individual carrying out an assignment (or a job) but actually thinking and behaving like a business. Just as any other successful business might do, you need to innovate and develop.

Steve Lungley, Interim Transformation Director, commented, “We will have had to (and continue to) define our services, identify the markets, sectors and environments in which we want to operate, develop marketing and channel strategies, sell our services and deliver them (brilliantly of course because our reputation depends on it) and manage all those other things like accounting, tax, VAT etc.”

Like any business understanding your routes to market is absolutely pivotal and developing both your personal and employer brand are key to finding that next assignment. Developing broader business management skills such as finance, sales and marketing are necessary to having a successful interim management business.

Barry Flack, Interim HR Director, said, “We have to supplement the assignment with a need to hone true business development capability – and personally – given that your proposition is everything. Then it requires a constant need to learn, adapt and stay relevant.”

To continuously develop your brand, you have to get your name out there through delivering successful assignments, communicating with key decisions makers and staying front of mind through social media channels (such as blogging, as well speaking and attending seminars in the relevant subjects and sectors).

Of course, all these activities take time and in the life of an interim this may be at the weekend, evenings or may even require you to take unpaid leave – so it’s not all plain sailing.

Although the activities outlined above certainly require additional time on top of the day job, they can bring increased opportunities.

Paul Powell, Interim Head of Resourcing, provides his insight, “Some of my moves have been intentional, gaining functional or sector knowledge and have involved calculated risk. It’s often meant stepping outside of the confines of my comfort zone. As a result, I have gained some good experience and a portfolio of skills, plus it has allowed me to share some pretty powerful insights with some clients.”

The interim market provides a wealth of opportunities and challenges, short-term problems to fix, ideas to come up with and to deliver quickly. It can, therefore, be an exciting place for the right people.

Sheryl Miller, Finance Transformation Expert, commented, “My hunch is that there is potentially more opportunity for career development as an interim, due to the variety of projects and challenges.”

If one has the desire to push themselves out of their comfort zone, the opportunities to put into practice your ideas and previous experience are plentiful.

Hayley Proctor, Interim Head of Resourcing, supports this, “Being the interim allows you the freedom to be bold and disruptive with your ideas to drive positive change…you are also expected to be the master of your ideas so learning and experimenting become the norm, whilst you’re given far more freedom and autonomy than your permanent counterparts.”

As an interim, there is no forced structure to your development as there is in permanent employment. You are expected to provide your own advice and guidance in this respect, to take responsibility for your own career and your own development.

Sharon Green, Interim OD and Change Expert, added, “I set aside a budget each year for CPD, ask clients for feedback and want to keep developing my business”.

Regardless of whether an individual is a permanent employee or an interim, if that person wishes to continuously develop their capabilities, they will progress.

I had a recent conversation with a senior HR director, who has just been offered a year’s extension. (And turned it down for the right reasons!) The CEO couldn’t believe that they were leaving, to go to nothing…who in their right mind would do this in permanent employment?

I think the feedback is overwhelmingly positive regarding interim careers – however, this is very different from being a permanent employee and won’t be for everyone!

So in summary:

-Interims are often thrown in the deep end and need to learn new skills.

-Interims need to be responsible for their own development and need to ensure that they make it happen.

-Interims think of themselves as a business – building a proposition and delivering against it.

-Interims are adaptable and learning broader skills (rather than developing their career vertically).

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

What day rate should an interim get paid?

What day rate should an interim get paid?
What day rate should an interim get paid?

I have been asked a lot of questions about day rates for interims over the years – what day rate should a client pay or at what day rate should someone enter the market are the most frequent.

This seems like the age-old question and sometimes it seems like there is little rhyme or reason as to why people pay what they do…

Unlike permanent search, where positions are set at market rate and are typically benchmarked accordingly, interim roles at the senior end of the market, tend to be more fluid dependant on a number of factors.

So here is my 2 pennies worth…

The interim standard for day rates is calculated as 220 days per annum + 30% on top (220 accounts for working days per annum, including some down time between contracts and the 30% is for the benefits that you would normally receive in a role.)

Please feel free to get in touch if you want some more detailed information or for some advice on benchmarking an assignment. You can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

Thinking of becoming an interim?

Thinking of becoming an interim?
Thinking of becoming an interim?

As the relationship between employer and employee continues to develop, there is no longer a ‘job for life’. These days many businesses buy in skills they either don’t possess or that they don’t want on the books for a long period of time (which makes sense if it’s for a one-off piece of work such as system implementation, acquisition, or a change programme).

Not only that, interims are often significantly cheaper and much better at implementation than the big 4 consultancies, so they are a much more attractive option for employers.

But what actually is an interim? And can I become one?

Before you take the leap into interim management, it’s worth considering if it is really for you. It may seem glamorous but operating as a sole entity can be lonely at times. Coupled with the pressure of constantly delivering in a project environment and searching for a new assignment a number of times per year, it can be very stressful.

Ahead of going to market, it is worth considering what you do well, what work you enjoy, and if these are the sorts of skills that clients might need to ‘buy in’.

Is it something that organisations might struggle to do successfully? If so, there could be a need for someone with your skillset.

As a guide, typical interim assignments can broadly fall into the following categories:

· Organisational and operational change programmes
· Project implementation and project recovery
· Technology/digital

“Getting the first gig is always the most challenging. A lot of people who have successfully made the transition have found the first 6 months especially difficult! Don’t let that put you off.”

My advice for getting your first assignment:

Stick with what you know; it can be much easier to get your first assignment with your current employer or with someone you have worked with in the past (for a search partner, this can also gain confidence that you deliver, if you are asked back by a former employer!).

Network extensively; assignments are normally found either through your own network or via an interim management intermediary. It’s important to build a strong network of contacts in both camps – and anticipate to have a blend of work from either side.

Invest in yourself; you need to start thinking of yourself as a business! If you’re looking to become a recognised project manager and don’t have the qualifications, I’d thoroughly recommend investing in your own development. Most employers look for Prince2, MSP or PMP, as well as sound delivery experience in a particular focus area.

Get some professional advice; there are a number of professional bodies such as the IIM or IMA who can give you advice and guidance. Many interim managers are really open to being helpful, so ask their advice – this also helps to build your network.

Create a proposition; successful interims either have a deep specialism in a particular area (which makes them a front runner for assignments and means they can typically charge a premium rate! However, they might be on the bench for a while if that market goes quiet). They may also have a broader skill set and need to take a variety of assignments to keep their experience current (this will allow you to go for more roles but remember, until you’re established, you may find that you’re pipped to the post by professional interims managers.)

And don’t forget you’ll need to set up a Ltd company and get a good accountant! (It may seem like a significant outlay but trust me a good accountant is worth their weight in gold.)

 

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

The resurgence of M&A activity and what you can do to get it right

The resurgence of M&A activity
The resurgence of M&A activity

 

We’ve always been really proud to partner with some of the most prominent change agents in the market knowledge. A few years ago we interviewed someone who was leading the way from a people change perspective to talk about the latest trends, innovations and transformations. It’s still very current so we wanted to re-share.

The interview focused on the resurgence of M&A activity and what you can do to get it right. Liz Phillips from the FTSE250, restaurant and pubs business, Mitchells & Butlers shared her insights, knowledge and experiences with us. We talked to her about the process of buying and integrating the Orchid Pub Group and what made the project a success!

Talking Acquisition Integration with Liz Phillips, Director of Resourcing & Employee Relations, from M&B.

“Mitchells & Butlers (M&B) acquired the majority of The Orchid Group – comprising of 173 pubs and a fully operational Head Office – in June 2014, for £266m. The deal expanded the M&B share of the growing pub and restaurant market in line with its strategy. The aim was to convert the majority of sites, such as Harvester, Toby Carvery, Ember, Miller & Carter and Castle and Vintage Inns, to M&B brands and formats over a two year period. The average weekly take of M&B brands was £22.7k, compared to £15.3k in The Orchid Group. The expected savings and synergies from rationalisation and support functions were c.£6m per annum – definitely worth it!

A Board of Directors were appointed to lead the Company; Operations, Finance, HR and Programme Planning. This was a senior leadership team with clear accountability for all aspects of operating the business successfully and the integration. The team had not previously worked together but quickly established a strong rapport recognising each other’s roles, responsibilities and areas of strength.

“The priority was to ensure effective and ongoing communication with all 4,000 employees throughout the business from day one.” Liz explained.

The aim was to explain the wider business context and plans and provide regular updates throughout the period of integration. It was important to understand the cultural differences and psychological impact of change on all people within the business, particularly in closing the Head Office, to keep the business running effectively in the medium term.

“The people were amazing, supportive and open with us. Whilst we did everything we could to involve, reward and communicate, we really couldn’t have done it successfully without them. There have been ongoing 121s, briefings, newsletters, weekly updates, roadshows, training courses, match making for roles and conferences. We recognised aspects of the way they did business which we admired, particularly certain aspects of operational practices which knew we could learn from and have introduced into M&B.”

In terms of leading HR, the emphasis was to continue to recruit, develop and retain people to run the businesses in a rapidly changing environment. We closed the office early in 2015 affecting c.100 people. There were a number of redundancies, however, the focus has been on deployment and employability to enhance people’s skills and experiences for their future employment.

“The plan has now been delivered and performance is looking good from an employee engagement, scorecard and ROI perspective!”

A huge thank you to Liz for sharing her experiences of leading an acquisition programme and the challenges they encountered. We hope you found it useful.

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

The Interim role at board level

The Interim role at board level
The Interim role at board level

Business change and transformation – following the recession – moved to centre stage and it’s remained there! Many businesses, particularly those who have lost talented staff at all levels, are now faced with the opportunity for growth, but with a host of new challenges. These challenges include new competitors, technology and changing markets and businesses are beginning to realise that they can’t “transform” gradually, but need to make a step change and that’s where the ‘Professional Interim Executive’ earns their money and reputation.

The vision

It starts with a CEO or a Chairman that has the vision –sometimes this individual is also an interim recruited by a parent company or arriving via private equity –but more frequently, somebody who recognises the challenge and whilst valuing the talents of their existing team recognises that they are too embedded in how the organisation has operated, to be able to take a fresh view without some help. Often the first challenge for an interim at board level is to convince senior colleagues that they are not there to ease them out. (Although sometimes that is necessary!) But to help them take a fresh view of their business, the market, the customers, the operating processes and both develop and implement new strategies that will make change happen immediately.

Post-recession

What has changed “post-recession” is the speed of change. Whilst businesses have always been changing, there has been an acceptance that “change doesn’t happen overnight” and it can’t happen if the whole organisation isn’t on board. To use another analogy, “a long journey starts with a small step”. In 2014, that small step needed to be a leap, followed by a number of big steps, otherwise the change would falter and those first few steps will come to a halt.

In 2019, it is much of the same. Change is very important for businesses and bringing in an interim can help to make change happen quickly and effectively. It is even more fundamental now with all the uncertainty for businesses around Brexit.

The interim role

Businesses bring in interims at different levels in the organisation, sometimes to lead particular projects, sometimes to fill vacancies during a recruitment process and sometimes because a function/departmental head has seen the need to “transform” their particular function. All valid reasons for recruiting an interim, but real change has to come from the top and that requires the main ‘change agent’ to be operating at the ‘Senior Leadership Team’ level. It doesn’t have to be the CEO, however, clearly the CEO has to be receptive and supportive.

It is an exciting time to be an interim, but it’s vital for the future and the reputation of the profession, that we recognise that whilst you need to be committed to any business you work with, as an interim you are not “part of the business”, but there to take a fresh perspective. Once you begin to feel part of the business, it’s time to end the contract!

Paul Duncan is the founder of Duncan Paul Ltd, an experienced HR/Change Director and Business Expert. Paul provides consultancy providing strategic advice on the management of Change Management, Business Transformation, Business Strategy and Planning, Organisational Design and Development, and Employee Relations (Union Negotiation at all levels).

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

What is organisational development?

 

What is organisational development?
What is organisational development?

 

A lot has changed since I started re:find 4 years ago, but the principles are still the same. I want to help make your business better, through recruiting the right people!

I want to go back to the start and look into my world of organisational development (OD). As an OD expert, I help build high performing businesses. Yes, it is a fancy title. So what is it exactly that I do?

OD is about how organisations’ function and, more importantly, how they can work better. There is no one single OD theory, but there are plenty of best practice models that give discipline to my work which is a combination of “hard” and “soft” issues.

Hard issues such as the external environment, vision, strategy, structure, tasks and skills. Soft issues such as culture, values, work climate, motivation, management practices and individual needs. Hard or soft, my end game is always to help your business achieve great individual and organisational performance.

Re-creating your strategy
Technological, demographic and geographic change is constant, whether we like it not. I have a view that organisational development (OD) should be a constant, organic, evolving process of change, improvement and development to meet what is an ever-changing internal and external market.

What does this mean for you, the business leader? There are one-off situations where a leader finds something that they find distinctly undesirable and wants to change it. Mostly, OD is about being on the ball, revisiting core business capabilities, revising old strategies or implementing new strategies to make sure that your business survives and thrives, in line with the market.

So I encourage my clients to think about the product, where it sits in its sector, competitors, suppliers, customers, technological advances and the threat of new entrants into the market – the stuff of Porter’s five forces.

Are you a market leader or follower? Are you asset light or asset heavy? Who’s doing something new out there? Keep your market intelligence up to date. As Jack Welch once said, “Change before you have to.”

When you make a change to a strategy it always has a knock-on on effect on certain areas of the business – structure, process, people and culture. Some experts will argue which is affected first. Stop! All are interconnected and have to be considered in the round.

So, exactly what part do I play? Well, I help you to recreate your strategy.

Process
Changing strategy means some of your core processes will change. Your team, using their end to end technical process knowledge, will now need to assess, analyse, discover, redefine and redesign certain processes. This will be key to maintaining and improving service to customers and should not be rushed.

You will need a disciplined method of considering workflow design, IT, motivation and measurement, policies and rules, people, resources and facilities.

I can help you redefine the process. Some folk call it ‘business process re-engineering’.

Structure
The new process will impact the structure and reorganisation of staff, resources and facilities. Policy led and technological systems will have to be addressed.

Technology is an enabler for strategy. Since the days of the Luddites, technological advances have meant that smart machinery has replaced skilled workforces and that the smart machinery has required a new set of technical expertise to maintain and develop.

I can help you to design the proposed organisation model.

People
Today, we are all technologists with our smartphones, iPads and social media, but most people still don’t like change. Communicating your logic and passion for change, consulting and listening and remaining organized, tenacious, sensitive to reactions, adaptable and resilient will help you to make a successful change.

I can help you gain acceptance of change and manage the transformation programme.

Culture
Your current core capabilities, management systems and culture are likely to limit your ability to implement the new strategy and will also need to be adjusted.

Company culture is difficult to change and sometimes it is a case of “working with what you have got” and morphing it into “what you need”, to drive the strategy. Leadership, reward, training, employee branding, recruitment, management practices and other motivating factors can be introduced to help culture evolve. Perhaps the most powerful impact on culture comes from a good learning infrastructure.

Your culture is unique and I can help you call on the creativity, best practices and lesson learned from other organisations.

Darwin once said, “It’s not the strongest species that survive, or even the most intelligent. It is those most adaptable to change”.

He has a point you know!

Ruth Gawthorpe is the founder of The Change Directors. She is an expert in Organisational Devlopment, HR and Change Management and works with organisations to help them build high performance cultures. Ruth is passionate about using her skills to support executive teams to get the results quickly and smoothly and would like to share her lessons learned and wisdom with you.

 

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

Are HR folk really masters of organisational change?

 

Are HR folk really masters of organisational change?
Are HR folk really masters of organisational change?

There’s one thing that frequently surprises me about the mainstream HR narrative. It’s the unflappable belief that HR folk are masters of organisational change – that they take change in their stride and it’s done with a process-driven approach, that removes the inevitable emotion that goes with it.

But here’s my issue. Yes, this might be true for change that affects everyone else, but what if ‘change’ is actually happening to them? What if HR people are the ones that are being impacted by the shadow of uncertainty that they sometimes (purposely or not) impose on everyone else?

In these instances, I’ve found that the truth is closer to this: that in actual fact, HR professionals are ‘not’ the resilient people we expect them to be. But that’s just my point. In these instances, we shouldn’t actually expect them to be super-human, emotionless people. The problem is that we often do.

Why?

Well, ultimately, HR folk are people too. When they’re impacted by change, they very quickly become just as ‘normal’ as any other employee. Some might call this ‘HR revealing their true colours’. But, just because they’re HR experts, does not, (and crucially, should not), make them somehow emotionally detached.

In fact, I think HR professionals have a reason to exhibit more fear than most – because they have a greater understanding of what’s really likely to happen; because they know the processes, and they know the score. When you think about it, it’s hardly surprising these people feel more vulnerable, because they can read between the lines more. They’re afraid because they’re more informed or aware. They’re already thinking whether processes being discussed are open and transparent, and whether people really know more than they’re letting on – often because that’s how they’ve been taught to do so.

Does this matter?

Yes, I believe so. Organisational change can only happen when everyone – and that truly means everyone – is behind the change and engaged with it. It’s my view that HR is pivotal in making broader organisation change happen, but this can only happen, if they themselves are not suspicious of the process and how it will impact them.

Even if there is an agreed business case for making change, different people have different methods for presenting it. By and large, the HR community has been taught to question change, so without these people on-board, there can be barriers and obstacles to change.

The only way to eliminate this, is for the business to talk to HR consistently – as if they’re all being impacted the same as anyone else. This is the only way the business can get a better breed of change professional, and one that is engaged in the process. So often, I hear HR folk say they’re being told that there is going to be restructure, and that they should come up with suggestions for how to achieve it, but what’s missing is a way for them to participate without wondering how their own function is being affected. You can’t expect this level of buy-in without telling HR straight about how change is coming to them.

What many people forget, is that when HR is dealing with organisational change, they are worried about how the change will impact their own jobs, but they are also expected to get on with their day job too. This could be a change they are managing for their client group. This is emotionally draining.

Getting the best out of HR:

All businesses need to recognise that to get the best out of HR, they must support them, and give them insights, and most importantly, not forget that they are real people too. After all, they have been hired precisely because of their ‘people’ skills. Without garnering this support, the internal change agents you need HR to be may not do things with the business’s interest at heart.

Remember, it is totally appropriate to expect HR to perform, but it should also not be forgotten that HR folk are employees too. It’s important their feelings are talked about, and that it’s done with genuine respect for the skills they have.

My advice is to be straight. If you don’t know something, tell HR you don’t know. If you do know some things, tell them those things. The business of planning for change should include these elements from the start, but sometimes they can be overlooked. Remember, seek to be open, but in a managed way. There’s nothing worse than catching HR professionals off-guard about change. Of course, we should expect HR experts to be mature, and professional, but let’s not forget that sometimes, because they are armed with more knowledge, they will often need more nurturing.

Josh Sunsoa is the founder of Sunsoa & Co, an specialist ‘Employment Relations’ consultancy providing professional strategic advice on the management of business restructuring, executive and managed terminations, TUPE transfers, HR case management and compliance

To discuss further, you can email me on James@refind.co.uk.

You can view more about James Cumming our change and business transformation specialist here.

Why are we all so scared of business change?

Why are we all so scared of business change?

We all know what it feels like to be anxious and unmotivated when it comes to our professional lives, yet even with these feelings, we’re still hesitant about implementing change.

Change can be intimidating, but it can also present much-needed opportunities for growth and development that you wouldn’t experience if you stayed in the same, comfortable and familiar role that you’re in at the moment.

Everyone has different ways of dealing with change, but how can you incorporate change into your everyday working life if the prospect feels overwhelming?

One popular model, the change curve, can be used to help understand the varying stages of personal change and ensure that the correct support can be provided as needed.

The change curve identifies six different stages that people experience when they go through change. These stages are:

–      Stage 1: Initial reaction

–      Stage 2: Self-criticism

–      Stage 3: Confusion and doubt

–      Stage 4: Acceptance and rationalisation

–      Stage 5: Solutions and problem solving

–      Stage 6: Normalising the change

As you work through the various stages of the change curve, you’ll start to notice the positive effects of personal and business change and be able to identify at what stage you’re stuck at. Once you know this, you can find the best support to help you successfully transition into the next stage.

Whilst business change may not always be successful, it’s important to take the value of a new experience seriously.

To have a chat about your executive search, contact me at carl@refind.co.uk.
You can view more about Carl Hinett our Executive search of HR professionals specialist here.