How to Create your Company Culture?

Creating a company culture in today’s world involves thoughtful planning, intentional actions, and a focus on fostering an inclusive, positive, and purpose-driven environment. Here’s a step-by-step guide to help you get started:

1. Define Your Values and Mission:

  • Clarify Core Values: Identify the values that will guide your company. These are the principles that define your organisation’s character and serve as the foundation for your culture.
  • Craft a Mission Statement: Develop a concise and inspiring mission statement that communicates the purpose and goals of your company.

2. Leadership Commitment:

  • Lead by Example: Ensure that company leaders embody and exemplify the desired culture. Leadership commitment is crucial for establishing a cultural tone and influencing employee behaviour.

3. Involve Employees in the Process of Creating the Company Culture:

  • Collect Feedback: Solicit input from employees at all levels. Understand their perspectives on the current culture and gather ideas for the desired culture.
  • Co-create Values: Involve employees in the process of defining or refining the company’s values. This builds a sense of ownership and commitment.

4. Communication and Transparency:

  • Transparent Communication: Foster open and transparent communication. Keep employees informed about company goals, challenges, and successes.
  • Regular Updates: Regularly share updates on the company’s performance, achievements, and any changes that may impact employees.

5. Employee Recognition and Appreciation:

  • Recognition Programs: Implement employee recognition programs to acknowledge and reward behaviours that align with the company culture.
  • Celebrate Achievements: When we recognise our individual and team achievements, we are reinforcing the importance of contributions to the overall culture.

6. Establish Rituals and Traditions:

  • Team Building Activities: Organise regular team-building activities to strengthen relationships and create a sense of unity.
  • Cultural Traditions: Introduce rituals or traditions that reflect and reinforce the desired cultural attributes.

7. Provide Opportunities for Professional Growth within the Company Culture

  • Training and Development: Invest in training and development programs that align with the company’s values. This not only enhances skills but also communicates a commitment to employee growth.
  • Mentorship Programs: Establish mentorship programs to facilitate knowledge transfer and personal development.

8. Promote Work-Life Balance:

  • Flexible Work Arrangements: Consider offering flexible work arrangements to support employees’ work-life balance.
  • Wellness Initiatives: Implement wellness programs that address physical and mental well-being.

9. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion:

  • Diversity Initiatives: Foster a diverse and inclusive workplace by implementing diversity initiatives and ensuring equal opportunities for all employees.
  • Training on Inclusion: Provide training on inclusivity and create an environment where all employees feel valued and respected.

10. Measure and Adjust:

  • Employee Surveys: Conduct regular surveys to gauge employee satisfaction, engagement, and alignment with the company culture.
  • Feedback Loops: Establish mechanisms for ongoing feedback to identify areas for improvement and adjustment.

11. Adapt to Change:

  • Agility: In today’s rapidly changing world, be adaptable. A flexible culture can better navigate challenges and seize opportunities.

By incorporating these steps into your strategy, you’ll be on the path to creating a company culture that not only aligns with your values but also inspires and engages your employees in today’s dynamic business environment.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Creating strong team culture in remote and hybrid teams

In today’s dynamic work landscape where remote and hybrid work models have become the new norm, fostering a strong team culture is more crucial than ever.

As teams navigate through virtual spaces, the traditional methods of team building may seem outdated. But, with intentional efforts and creative strategies, building a resilient team culture in remote or hybrid work environments is not only possible but essential for organisational success. This blog explores effective tips and innovative ideas to strengthen your team’s cohesion, collaboration, and camaraderie in the digital era.

Introduction: Navigating the Challenges of Remote and Hybrid Team Building

As organisations embrace flexible work arrangements, the need for effective remote team building has never been more evident. Despite the physical distance, creating a sense of unity and shared purpose among team members is a goal that leaders can achieve with the right strategies. In this blog, we delve into practical tips and creative ideas to foster a robust team culture that thrives in virtual or hybrid work settings.

Understanding the Foundations: Clear Communication and Shared Goals

It’s essential to lay down the foundations for remote and hybrid team building. We should make clear communication and shared goals serve as the bedrock for a cohesive team culture even when members are miles apart. Establishing these foundations ensures that everyone is on the same page, fostering a sense of unity.

Tip 1: Establishing Open Lines of Communication

In a remote and hybrid environment, communication becomes the lifeline of a team. Encourage regular check-ins, video meetings, and the use of collaborative communication tools. Emphasise the importance of transparent and honest communication to build trust among team members.

Tip 2: Define and Communicate Clear Goals

Clearly defined goals provide the team with a sense of purpose and direction. Ensure that every team member understands their role in achieving these goals. Regularly revisit and reassess objectives to adapt to the evolving nature of work.

Building a Virtual Watercooler: Nurturing Social Connections

One of the challenges of remote and hybrid work is the absence of casual interactions that occur naturally in an office setting. To recreate the camaraderie of a physical workplace, leaders must proactively create opportunities for social connections.

Tip 3: Virtual Coffee Breaks and Informal Chats

Schedule virtual coffee breaks or informal chat sessions where team members can discuss non-work-related topics. This simulates the spontaneous interactions that happen around the office watercooler, fostering a sense of community.

Tip 4: Team-Building Icebreaker Activities

Incorporate fun and interactive icebreaker activities into virtual meetings. This could include virtual games, quizzes, or team challenges that encourage collaboration and create a relaxed atmosphere.

Acknowledging Achievements: Virtual Recognition and Appreciation

In a remote and hybrid setting, it’s crucial to celebrate successes and recognise individual and collective achievements. Acknowledging accomplishments boosts morale and creates a positive team culture.

Tip 5: Virtual Recognition Platforms

Implement virtual recognition platforms where team members can give shout-outs or recognitions to their colleagues. This not only highlights achievements but also reinforces a culture of appreciation.

Tip 6: Celebratory Virtual Events

Organise virtual events to celebrate milestones, birthdays, or team anniversaries. This could include virtual parties, themed events, or team-building exercises tailored to the remote setting.

Developing Trust in a Digital Space: Team Bonding Activities

Trust is the cornerstone of any successful team, and building and maintaining trust in a remote setting requires intentional effort.

Tip 7: Team-Building Workshops

Host virtual team-building workshops that focus on trust-building exercises. These can include activities that encourage vulnerability, effective communication, and understanding each other’s strengths and weaknesses.

Tip 8: Cross-Functional Collaboration

Encourage cross-functional collaboration by creating opportunities for team members from different departments to work together on projects. Resulting in not only enhanceing the skills but also strengthening interdepartmental relationships.

Ensuring Inclusivity: Remote and Hybrid Team Building for Everyone

In a dispersed work environment, it’s essential to ensure that remote and hybrid team-building activities are inclusive and cater to the diverse needs of team members.

Tip 9: Flexible Scheduling for Global Teams

If your team spans different time zones, consider rotating meeting times to accommodate everyone. This ensures that team members from various locations can actively participate in team-building activities.

Tip 10: Inclusive Virtual Events

Also, when planning virtual events, consider cultural sensitivities and preferences. Ensure that activities are inclusive and respectful of diverse backgrounds, fostering a sense of belonging for every team member.

Conclusion: Nurturing a Sustainable Remote and Hybrid Team Culture

Building a strong team culture in remote or hybrid work environments requires ongoing dedication and adaptability. By prioritising clear communication, social connections, recognition, trust-building, and inclusivity, leaders can create a resilient team culture that not only survives but thrives in the digital era. As the workplace continues to evolve, embracing innovative approaches to remote team building will be the key to fostering a collaborative and motivated remote workforce.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

How to have Productive Leadership Meetings

Productive leadership meetings are the linchpin of organisational success. To help you plan for that success, we delve into the nuances of how to have productive leadership meetings, and exploring strategies to enhance collaboration, decision-making, and overall team productivity.

Setting the Stage for Success: Planning and Preparation

Successful leadership meetings start with meticulous planning and preparation. As part of that preparation, it is important to ensure that the agenda is clear, concise, and aligned with the overarching goals of the organisation.

A well-structured agenda ensures that the meeting stays focused on crucial topics, enhancing the chances of productive discussions.

Engaging Leadership: Fostering Participation and Inclusivity

The meetings are not one-sided conversations. Encouraging active participation from all team members fosters a culture of inclusivity and collaboration.

Encouraging Participation for Success

Leaders should create an environment where team members feel comfortable expressing their opinions and ideas, contributing to a diverse range of perspectives.

Utilising Technology for Seamless Collaboration

Technology plays a pivotal role in fostering seamless collaboration during meetings. So think about technologies such as video conferencing tools, collaborative platforms, and real-time document sharing enhance communication and decision-making.

Effective Decision-Making: From Discussion to Action

It’s not just about talking; it’s about making decisions that drive the organisation forward. A structured decision-making process ensures that outcomes are clear, actionable, and aligned with strategic goals.

Decisive Leadership: Turning Discussions into Actionable Outcomes

Leaders should guide the team through a logical decision-making process, considering all relevant factors and ensuring that decisions are communicated effectively.

Time Management

In the fast-paced business environment, time is a precious commodity. Successful leadership meetings are well-paced, ensuring that discussions are thorough without unnecessary delays.

Leaders should be mindful of the agenda, allocate time effectively, and keep the meeting on track to respect everyone’s time.

Encouraging Innovation: Creating a Culture of Creative Exchange

Leadership meetings provide a platform for fostering innovation and creative thinking. Encouraging team members to share innovative ideas contributes to continuous improvement and adaptability.

Building Relationships: The Human Element

Beyond the business agenda, successful leadership meetings recognise the importance of building strong interpersonal relationships. Team-building exercises, casual conversations, and acknowledging achievements contribute to a positive team dynamic.

Relationship-Driven Leadership: Nurturing Bonds in Meetings

Leaders should invest time in cultivating a positive team culture, promoting camaraderie and mutual respect.

Continuous Improvement: Learning from Past Meetings

Post-meeting evaluations are crucial for ongoing success. Leaders should gather feedback, assess what worked well and what can be improved, and implement changes for future meetings.

Key Phrase: Evolving Leadership Meetings: The Power of Continuous Improvement

Related Blog: How to Conduct Effective Post-Meeting Evaluations

Overcoming Challenges: Common Hurdles in Leadership Meetings

By addressing common issues such as lack of engagement, conflicting opinions, or technology glitches, you will be showing proactive leadership and effective problem-solving.

Leaders should be prepared to address challenges promptly, maintaining the flow and productivity of the meeting.

Remote Leadership Meetings: Bridging the Distance Effectively

In an increasingly remote working landscape, leadership meetings often take place virtually. Leaders must adapt their strategies to ensure that remote meetings are as effective as those held in person.

Conclusion: A Blueprint for Success in Leadership Meetings

Our conclusion? Successful leadership meetings are a strategic imperative for organisational growth and cohesion. By meticulously planning agendas, fostering participation, leveraging technology, making informed decisions, and continuously improving, leaders can transform meetings into powerful drivers of success.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

New Year, New Me? New Year Resolutions for Businesses

The start of a new year often heralds a period of reflection and reinvention, and New Years Resolutions.

For individuals, this might translate into personal commitments and aspirations. However, businesses are not exempt from this ritual. In fact, as the calendar year nears its end, many companies are already asking, “New Year, New Me?”.

Here we delve into the trend of businesses making New Years Resolutions:

The Tradition of New Year Resolutions

Historically, New Year’s resolutions date back to the Babylonians, who made promises to their gods at the start of each year. These promises often revolved around returning borrowed items and paying off debts. In today’s age, tradition has evolved but the essence remains: setting goals for positive change.

Why Businesses Can’t Ignore New Year Resolutions

Just as individuals pledge to eat healthier or read more books, companies might decide to enhance customer relations, increase profitability, or launch a new product line. The principle remains the same: improvement and progress.

  1. Growth and Expansion: For businesses looking to scale, the new year could mark the beginning of tapping into new markets, exploring diverse product lines, or even mergers and acquisitions.
  2. Strengthening Customer Relations: Modern businesses understand the importance of a loyal customer base. Thus, the new year is an opportunity to roll out loyalty programmes, enhance customer service, or introduce community engagement initiatives.
  3. Sustainability: With rising awareness about environmental issues, many businesses are opting for sustainable practices. Come 2024, we could see more firms vowing to reduce their carbon footprint or eliminate plastic from their operations.

Planning is Key

The allure of the New Year is strong, but successful resolutions are built on foresight and preparation. Here’s why and how businesses should start planning their resolutions well in advance:

  1. Market Analysis: Before setting any goals, businesses need to have their fingers on the pulse of the market. Understanding evolving consumer behaviours, emerging trends, and potential disruptors can guide goal setting.
  2. Feedback Integration: End-of-year feedback from clients, stakeholders, and employees can provide invaluable insights. Harnessing this information can shape the resolutions for the coming year.
  3. Resource Allocation: Whether it’s hiring new talent, purchasing equipment, or investing in training, businesses need to ensure they have the necessary resources to fulfil their resolutions.

Personal Resolutions Within a Professional Framework

New Year’s resolutions aren’t exclusive to business entities. Employees, irrespective of their designation or role, can draft their own set of professional resolutions. By aligning personal goals with organisational objectives, employees can find a harmonious blend of personal and professional growth.

  1. Skill Development: With industries constantly evolving, employees might resolve to learn a new skill, attend workshops, or pursue further education.
  2. Networking: Building a robust professional network can open doors to opportunities. Attending more industry events or joining professional organisations might be on the cards for many.
  3. Wellness and Work-life Balance: Burnout is a real concern. Employees could aim for a healthier work-life balance, integrating wellness routines into their daily life.

Case Studies: Resolutions That Transformed Businesses

Let’s delve into some real-life examples where resolutions have made a noticeable difference:

  1. Company A’s Green Pledge: Starting 2022, Company A, a renowned beverage manufacturer, pledged to go plastic-free. Through extensive planning in 2021, they rolled out glass bottles in 2022. Not only did this move enhance their brand image, but it also led to increased sales.
  2. Company B’s Focus on Mental Health: Recognising the rising concerns around mental health, Company B, a tech giant, introduced mandatory wellness breaks and counselling sessions for employees in 2023. This boosted employee morale, reduced sick leaves, and enhanced overall productivity.

In Conclusion

New Year’s resolutions for businesses aren’t just a trend. They’re an essential introspection tool, guiding companies towards sustainable growth. While 2024 awaits with its set of challenges and opportunities, preparedness, backed by resolutions, can set the stage for a prosperous year ahead.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe
that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term
partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients,
providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best
talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique
and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment.
That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the
specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a
full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service.
As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your
organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and
experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

How to Best Find a New Job in Leadership

Whether you’re an experienced leader or someone eager to climb the corporate ladder, finding a new job in a leadership role is a journey. It requires the right mix of introspection, strategy, and action. This guide will walk you through the steps to help you land that coveted leadership role.

1. Knowing when the time is right to move on

It’s essential to recognise when it’s time to move on from your current position. Here are some signs:

  • You’ve outgrown your current role.
  • There’s limited room for growth or new challenges.
  • You feel undervalued or unsatisfied with your work environment.

Trust your instincts. If you consistently feel like it’s time for a change, it likely is.

2. Searching for a new job in leadership

There are various platforms to find a new job in leadership:

  • Job boards: Sites like LinkedIn, Indeed, and Reed.co.uk often have a plethora of leadership roles.
  • Networking: Join professional groups and associations related to your industry.
  • Recruitment agencies: Many specialise in senior roles and leadership positions.

Before diving in, take these preparatory steps:

  • Update your CV: Highlight achievements, leadership roles, and significant projects.
  • LinkedIn: Ensure your profile is updated, professional, and mirrors your CV.
  • Research: Understand the current market, industry trends, and the skills in demand.

4. Choosing the right companies to apply for

Not all companies will align with your values or career goals. Research each potential employer by:

  • Reviewing their website and mission statement.
  • Checking employee reviews on platforms like Glassdoor.
  • Understanding the company culture and growth potential.

5. How to best prepare for an interview

Once you’ve landed an interview, preparation is key:

  • Research the company: Know its history, challenges, competitors, and up-to-date news.
  • Practice common leadership interview questions: This will help you articulate your thoughts clearly.
  • Plan your outfit: Dressing professionally makes a positive first impression.

6. How to stand out for the job

Standing out is more than just having the required skills:

  • Show passion: Be enthusiastic about the role and the company.
  • Showcase achievements: Quantify results whenever possible.
  • Ask thoughtful questions: This demonstrates your genuine interest and thorough preparation.

7. Knowing if a company is the right fit for you

Securing a job offer is exciting, but it’s equally essential to ensure the company is a good fit:

  • Company culture: Does the environment align with your values?
  • Growth opportunities: Will there be room for professional advancement?
  • Work-life balance: Does the company promote a healthy balance or expect constant overtime?

Remember, an interview is as much about them getting to know you as it is about you getting to know them.

Conclusion

Finding a new leadership role requires time, patience, and strategy. By knowing when it’s time to move on, searching in the right places, preparing thoroughly, and ensuring a company aligns with your goals, you can find a job that not only matches your skills but also brings joy and satisfaction. Happy job hunting!

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

The Future of Work in the Next 10 Years?

The world of work is always changing. Every year, new technology, changing attitudes, and global events shape the way we work. But what will the next decade bring? Let’s dive into the future of work and see what predictions we’re hearing already for the next 10 years.

1. More Remote Work

One thing we’ve learnt recently is that many jobs can be done from home. Thanks to the internet and tools like video calls, many of us can work from anywhere. Regarding the future of work in the next 10 years, experts reckon that even more of us will be working from home or from other places, not just the office.

2. Learning all the Time

With new tech and tools coming out all the time, we’ll all need to keep learning. This means that ongoing training will be a big part of most jobs. So, get ready to be a student for life as the future of work changes.

3. Well-being at Work

People are understanding more and more that happy workers do better work. Companies will focus on making sure their staff are happy, healthy, and feel good at work. This could mean more breaks, better workspaces, or even things like yoga classes.

4. Green Jobs

As we all try to look after our planet better, there’ll be more jobs in green industries in the future of work. This could be things like making clean energy, designing eco-friendly products, or helping companies be greener.

5. Robots and People Working Together

Some people worry that robots will take all the jobs. But many experts think that robots will work alongside us. This means we might work with machines, using them to help us do our jobs better.

6. Flexibility will be Key

The 9-to-5 workday might become a thing of the past. More companies will let people choose when and where they work. This is great news for people who like to work at different times or in different places.

7. More Teamwork

In the future, many of us will work in teams more often. This means we’ll need to be good at working with other people, understanding their ideas, and sharing our own.

To Wrap Up

The future of work sounds exciting, right? There’ll be challenges, of course, but also loads of new opportunities. One thing is for sure – the world of work will keep changing, and we’ll all need to be ready to change with it.

Looking for more insights into the world of work? Keep an eye on our blogs and posts for the latest news and trends.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Change management in public sector organisations: how to succeed

Change management in public sector organisations refers to the process of implementing and managing changes within governmental agencies, departments, and other public entities. It involves planning, coordinating, and guiding the transition from existing practices to new ones, in order to improve efficiency, service delivery, and overall effectiveness.

Whilst change management principles are similar across both public and private sectors, there are some key differences in how they are applied in public sector organisations, because of the nature of the public sector.

Stakeholder Engagement

Public sector organisations typically have a broader range of stakeholders compared to private organisations, due to the fact they have a wider public interest. These stakeholders include citizens, elected officials, community groups, and interest organisations. Change management in the public sector emphasises the need for extensive stakeholder engagement and consultation to ensure transparency, accountability, and democratic decision-making. Without extensive stakeholder engagement, you can face a whole host of problems including:

  • Lack of transparency
  • Resistance
  • Unforeseen challenges
  • Legal issues
  • Ethical issues

Regulatory Framework

Public sector organisations operate within a framework of legislation, policies, and regulations that guide their operations. Change management in the public sector must take into account these regulatory requirements and ensure compliance throughout the change process. This may involve conducting legal reviews, obtaining approvals from regulatory bodies, and adhering to public procurement procedures.

Without following these, they are open to legal repercussions, operational disruptions and financial implications and finally, damage their reputation.

Political Considerations

Public sector organisations are susceptible to political influences and the decisions of elected officials. Change management in the public sector often necessitates navigating political dynamics, fostering agreement among diverse stakeholders, and overseeing the potential impact of shifting political priorities on the suggested changes. This introduces an additional level of complexity to the change management process.

This requires political sensitivity – staying informed about the political landscape and using an evidence-based approach to counter political pressures. You need to be truly flexible to political environments, that can be unpredictable.

Public Accountability

Public sector organisations are accountable to the public they serve. Change management emphasises the need for transparency, public involvement, and effective communication throughout the change process. Public sector organisations often have to justify the need for change, demonstrate the expected benefits, and address concerns raised by the public.

This is a clear difference between the private sector, which is accountable to its shareholders, employees, customers, and other stakeholders. They have a responsibility to operate ethically, comply with relevant laws and regulations, and provide accurate and transparent financial reporting. Private organisations may have their own governance structures, such as boards of directors or executive committees, that ensure accountability and oversight, but not the public.

Long-Term Sustainability

Public sector organisations typically have a long-term perspective and aim to create sustainable change. Change management in the public sector often involves strategic planning, capacity building, and creating a culture of continuous improvement to ensure that changes are embedded and sustained over time.

There are many differences between public and private sector change programmes, which need to be considered to ensure its success. As with all change programmes strong stakeholder engagement, clear and timely communication and employee involvement and support are crucial.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

We understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on re:find please get in contact with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Mastering the Craft: The Keys to Successful Organisational Development

In today’s rapidly changing business environment, organisations must be able to adapt quickly to remain competitive. To achieve this, they must constantly strive to improve their processes, systems, and culture. Organisational development is a systematic approach to change management that aims to enhance an organisation’s overall effectiveness and performance. It involves a range of interventions, such as team building, leadership development, change management, and performance management, that are designed to help individuals, teams, and the organisation as a whole to work more effectively, efficiently, and cohesively.

Mastering the craft of organisational development is essential for any organisation seeking to achieve sustained success. By developing a deep understanding of the principles and practices of organisational development, leaders can create a culture of continuous learning and improvement that enables their organisation to adapt and thrive in a rapidly changing business environment.

In this blog, we’ll explore the keys to successful organisational development, including the principles and practices that underpin it, and the benefits it can bring to your organisation. Whether you’re a business leader, a human resources professional, or an organisational development practitioner, this blog will provide you with valuable insights and practical tips for mastering the craft of organisational development. So, let’s get started!

What is organisational development?

Organisational development (OD) is a planned, systematic process of change that helps organisations improve their effectiveness. It involves the use of behavioural science knowledge and techniques to diagnose organisational problems and to develop and implement strategies that will lead to improved organisational performance.

OD can be broad ranging, including changes to an organisation’s structure, culture, leadership, systems, and processes. The ultimate goal of OD is to help organisations become more adaptable, innovative, and responsive to the changing needs of their customers, employees, and other stakeholders.

OD is often used by a company to solve issues, such as low employee morale, high turnover rates, or ineffective communication. OD practitioners collaborate closely with organisational leaders and staff to identify the root causes of these issues and create solutions that are tailored to the unique needs of the organisation.

Overall, the goal of OD is to create a healthy and productive work environment that supports the achievement of organisational goals while also promoting the well-being and development of employees.

OD strategy for your business

Organisational development (OD) can be used to support and enhance business strategy in several ways. Some of the key ways that OD can be used for business strategy are:

  1. Aligning the organisation’s structure with its strategy: OD practitioners can help businesses to design their organisational structure to better support their strategic goals. This can involve creating new departments or teams, redefining roles and responsibilities, or streamlining processes to increase efficiency and effectiveness.
  2. Building a high-performance culture: OD an be used to create a culture of high performance that supports the achievement of business goals. This can involve developing leadership skills, promoting teamwork, and establishing a set of shared values and behaviours that support the organisation’s strategic objectives.
  3. Developing talent: OD can be used to identify and develop the skills and capabilities that are required to execute the organisation’s business strategy. This may involve implementing training and development programs, coaching and mentoring, or succession planning to ensure that the organisation has the talent it needs to achieve its goals.
  4. Improving communication and collaboration: OD interventions can help to improve communication and collaboration within the organisation, which is essential for successful execution of business strategy. This can involve improving internal communication channels, implementing team-building initiatives, and promoting a culture of transparency and openness.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES ORGANISATIONS FACE WITH REGARDS TO ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT?

Organisations that fail to invest in effective organisational development may face a range of challenges that can impact their performance and sustainability. Here are some of the challenges that poor organisational development can create:

  1. Lack of Adaptability: Poor organisational development can lead to a lack of adaptability, making it difficult for organisations to respond to changes in the business environment. This can result in lost opportunities, decreased competitiveness, and even business failure.
  2. Low Employee Engagement: Poor organisational development can lead to low levels of employee engagement and motivation, which can result in reduced productivity, high turnover rates, and difficulties in attracting and retaining talent.
  3. Ineffective Leadership: Poor organisational development can result in ineffective leadership, as leaders may not have the skills and knowledge to effectively manage and develop their teams. This can result in poor decision-making, low morale, and a lack of direction within the organisation.
  4. Inefficient Processes: Poor organisational development can lead to inefficient processes, as teams may not be structured in an optimal way or have the necessary skills to perform their roles effectively. This can result in delays, errors, and increased costs.
  5. Poor Company Culture: Poor organisational development can also result in a negative company culture, where employees do not feel valued or supported, and there is a lack of trust and collaboration within the organisation. This can result in high levels of absenteeism, low job satisfaction, and difficulties in retaining talent.

HOW CAN ORG DEVELOPMENT FIT IN TO AN OVERALL HR TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Organisational development (OD) can play a critical role in an overall HR transformation programme, as it focuses on enhancing the performance and effectiveness of the organisation as a whole. Here are some ways that OD can fit into an HR transformation programme:

  1. Alignment with HR Strategy: Organisational development initiatives should align with the broader HR strategy of the organisation. By doing so, they can support the organisation’s overall goals and contribute to a comprehensive HR transformation programme.
  2. Cultural Transformation: Organisational development can play a key role in driving cultural transformation. By promoting a culture of continuous learning and improvement, OD can help to foster a growth mindset and promote innovation, which are essential for success in today’s fast-paced business environment.
  3. Talent Management: Organisational development can help organisations to develop their talent management practices, including recruitment, training, and development. By focusing on the development of people, OD can help to create a more engaged and productive workforce.
  4. Change Management: Organisational development can provide a framework for managing change effectively. By using OD techniques, organisations can help their employees to adapt to change and ensure that the changes they implement are sustained over the long term.
  5. Leadership Development: Organisational development can play a key role in developing leadership capability within an organisation. By focusing on leadership development, OD can help to create a strong pipeline of talent and ensure that the organisation is well-equipped to deal with future challenges.

OD career options

Typically, a career journey in OD involves the following stages:

  1. Entry-level OD roles: Individuals may begin their OD career as an OD coordinator, analyst, or assistant. In these roles, they would support the implementation of OD interventions, analyze data, and assist with communication and stakeholder engagement.
  2. OD specialist: As individuals gain experience and expertise in OD, they may advance to a specialist role where they lead specific OD interventions or projects. This may include designing and implementing change management initiatives, developing leadership development programs, or conducting organisational assessments.
  3. OD consultant: Experienced OD professionals can move in to consulting where they work with external clients to provide OD advice and support. They may work for a consulting firm such as one of the big 4 (PWC, KPMG, Deloitte or EY) or as an independent consultant. They will provide a wide range of OD services, including strategic planning, leadership development, and team-building.
  4. OD manager/director: Some people decide to progress they may move into a management or director-level role where they oversee the OD function within an organisation. In this role, they would be responsible for developing and implementing the OD strategy, managing a team of OD professionals, and working closely with senior leaders to align OD initiatives with business goals.
  5. Executive-level OD roles: In some cases, experienced OD professionals may advance to an executive-level role within an organisation, such as Chief People Officer or Chief Human Resources Officer. In these roles, they would drive the overall people strategy for the organisation, which includes OD initiatives aimed at improving organisational effectiveness and driving business results
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Every organisation is unique and we feel that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. re:find offer bespoke recruitment solutions, that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We commit to providing our clients with the highest quality service. We take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills needed for each campaign.

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Higher education: a revolutionary transformation journey

Higher education: a revolutionary transformation journey

For our featured blog this week, Sarah spoke to Sravan Banerjee, Organisation Design and Change Management professional, who shared his insightful experience of a recent large scale change and transformation project that he led in the Higher Education sector, with a leading UK University.

Transformation – a word often used, maybe overused, that has numerous connotations on its own. It means different things to different organisations and even within the same organisation, there are multiple versions floating around.

However, the meaning of the word has never rung truer than during this unprecedented crisis we find ourselves in globally. Organisations today are battling challenges on multiple fronts not the least of which is how to stay operationally viable in the short term, but also take a long hard look at their longer-term operating model.

This challenge is sector agnostic and be it private or public most business leaders face similar challenges. The Higher Education sector interestingly has perhaps remained the last bastion – largely unchallenged in its ways of working and perhaps not feeling the need to challenge the status quo as much as other sectors.  

But with Brexit looming, the unrelenting onslaught of the pandemic and mounting operational pressures, the Higher Education (HE) sector faces venturing into the unchartered territory of transformation not only at the operational level but at a more fundamental level around its model and ways of working.

I was fortunate enough to have worked for a world-renowned client in the HE Sector who, while remaining one of the crown jewels of the Higher Education, realised early on the need to change. They embarked on a transformation journey that would fundamentally change their operating model to set up a revolutionary Shared Service Centre which would allow them to drive scale and be operationally efficient through extensive use of technology. This would ensure the enabling functions were true Centres of Excellence offering specialist advice and were true partners to the schools and colleges. Equally, this allowed the schools and colleges to focus their energy on academic pursuits and excellence and avoid duplication of accountabilities and capabilities – thus making them more outward focused.

The engagement was a learning experience like few others, as this was a ‘first off the blocks’ journey, both in terms of the scale of operation, as well as the mindset change.

The key takeaways for me are as follows:

  • Acknowledge the problem

The first step to fixing a problem is recognising there is one. My client was cognisant enough to recognise the challenges they faced in the coming years if they did not transform – hence felt the urgency to change. The critical takeaway for me here was how the senior figures within the University (including the Provost and Vice Provost) were starting to get behind the need to change. For me, that is one of the critical indicators of a successful change journey – the leadership recognising the problem and talking about it openly. Through that simple step, we had already started to make vital inroads into the change journey.

  • Treat everyone as a customer

An interesting lesson I learnt was how the client shifted its focus to a more customer-centric model. What I mean by that is:

-The academic fraternity looking at their corporate partners driving research grants, as customers and slowly moving to a more commercially focused and outcome-driven partnership with them.
-The University treating its existing and incoming students as customers and changing the ‘Customer/Student Experience Journey’ by identifying the various touchpoints for a student, reducing the number of interactions, and making each interaction meaningful.
-The enabling functions treating the schools and colleges as their customers and getting into ‘providing a superlative advisory service’ mindset.

  • Engage the right people

Change is not a dark room exercise where we go into a tunnel and magically emerge with a solution that works for everyone. It is painful, it is hard, and it takes courage. Most importantly it takes engagement with the right set of people to take them along on the journey. My client realised this early on in the process and set up numerous avenues to engage and interact with people (surveys, learning cafes, Communities of Practice) to ensure colleagues felt ‘they were doing it’ instead of ‘it being done to them’. It was not always easy. It did feel at times that we were regressing but carrying on the engagement process in the spirit it was started was ultimately the difference between success and failure.

  • A shift in ways of working and mindset

Perhaps the single largest piece of the puzzle was the internal shift – not only in ways of working but what that meant for the operational mindset within the University. Of course, Op Model and Org Design helped translate strategy into ways of working and provided clear roles and accountabilities. But implementing that design required a broad change narrative around ‘the why’ and more importantly required the schools and colleges to be comfortable with the fact that some capabilities would not be dedicated/siloed into their structures. The critical message to get across was ‘they were not losing a capability’ but rather ‘gaining a multitude of specialist services’ that would free up their time to focus on what they love doing most. This was the key message we iterated again and again (and again) with our academic stakeholders. This open channel of communication was critical for success with my client and went a long way to support the implementation of the change journey.

  • Eye of the prize

Lastly, one of the key things that my client did consistently well, was to keep their focus on the desired outcomes for the change. When kicking off a major transformation piece, it is very easy for it to snowball into something else entirely and before you know it, it has grown arms and legs and is an industry on its own. To prevent this from happening, my client had a set of 4/5 desired outcomes which were agreed at the very onset of the programme and from which they never wavered. This helped contain the scope of the Transformation piece effectively and just as importantly allowed us to iterate and re-iterate a set of key messages which ultimately became the engine for the change journey.

Sravan offers Organisation Design and Change Management services. You can find more about what Sravan on LinkedIn here.

Simplifying the ‘Change Journey’ – can a Change Advisory Board help?

Simplifying he change journey

A change-advisory board (CAB) delivers support to a change-management team by approving requested changes, assisting in the assessment and prioritisation of changes.   A CAB is an integral part of a defined change-management process designed to balance the need for change with the need to minimise inherent risks. 

The CAB members should selectively be chosen to ensure that the requested changes are thoroughly checked and assessed from both a technical and business perspective. The considered change will dictate the required personnel to convene in a CAB meeting.  

A CAB offers multiple perspectives necessary to ensure proper decision-making. For example, a decision made solely by IT may fail to recognise the concerns of accounting. The CAB is tasked with reviewing and prioritising requested changes, monitoring the change process and providing managerial feedback. 

How do you manage a CAB effectively? 

Here are four good tips to running a CAB: 

1. Get the agenda out early and encourage discussions before the CAB. 
Don’t wait until the last minute to publish the upcoming CAB schedule. One of the frustrating things about attending CABs is that attendees often don’t really know much about the changes until they get to the meeting. Publish the list early so attendees have a chance to get up to speed on the proposed changes. This way, they can get with change requestors and sponsors before the meeting to get a clear understanding of what is proposed. If you don’t, then your CAB will be overtaken with efforts to solve any personal issues people have with proposed changes. 

2. DECISION MAKERS attend the CAB. 
The CAB members should be selected based on their knowledge and meaningful input to the meeting. What happens when CAB invitees can’t make it and send their designated hitters? Simple: ensure that then people attending have the authority to speak on the behalf of the person they are sitting in for. There’s nothing more frustrating than discussing a change and a key role says “I don’t think I can speak on that, I’ll have to get approval from my boss.” If they can’t speak on behalf of their boss, then they don’t need to be there. You can either clarify this need with the attendees before the meeting, or reschedule the discussion to a later CAB when the key personnel can attend. 

3. Know your decision thresholds. 
Do not attempt to approve a change that is bigger than you. Follow your organisation’s governance guidelines and determine the rules to decision making. This means that you should know exactly what thresholds (pound amount, risk level, impact, urgency, etc.) you are capable of approving. 

4. Careful not to get into “rubber stamping.” 

Many CABs get overwhelmed with complex and numerous changes. The pressures of getting through these changes during a meeting are enormous. This often results in sloppy approvals that may not receive proper assessment – and can cause incidents once deployed. Ensure that every change request receives the proper attention by scheduling enough time to discuss them. Also, be careful not to blindly approve a request simply based on who is requesting it. I remember a situation where a CAB approved a change simply based on who was requesting it. This “rubber stamp” approval resulted in a poorly managed deployment that caused several hours of downtime. The lesson learned here is that it doesn’t matter who is asking, every change must have the proper amount of analysis and scrutiny. 

To discuss this article further, you can email me on danny@refind.co.uk

re:find help businesses find the talent they need to deliver transformational change.  Clients call us when they need change to happen quickly and effectively. We are Executive Search and Interim Search specialists. 

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