How to ‘Flex Work’ in the Pharmaceutical Industry?

What is Flex Work?

Flex work, known also as flexible working, means giving employees more control over when, where, and how they work.

This can include remote working, flexible hours, compressed workweeks, and job sharing. The idea really took off during the COVID-19 pandemic when businesses had to adapt to keep things running smoothly.

Flexible working has become a big deal in many industries, and pharma is no exception. This blog dives into what flexible working is, where it came from, and why it’s important for the pharmaceutical sector. We’ll look at the benefits and challenges, different working models, and how to implement flex work in a way that works for everyone.

I know flexible working is a hot topic, and there’s a ton of stuff out there about it. I’ll focus on insights and tips tailored specifically for pharma companies, tackling industry-specific challenges and opportunities.

Best Way to Implement Flexible Working in Pharma

Bringing flexible working to the pharmaceutical industry takes some thought and planning. Here are some key steps to make it work:

  1. Assess Job Roles and Responsibilities: Not every job in pharma can be done remotely. Figure out which roles can be flexible without hurting productivity or compliance.
  2. Invest in Technology: Make sure employees have the right tech to do their jobs well from anywhere. This means secure VPNs, collaboration tools, and data management systems.
  3. Provide Training: Help employees and managers learn the skills they need for remote work. This includes using digital tools, good communication practices, and keeping a healthy work-life balance.
  4. Set Clear Expectations: Lay down the rules for flexible working. This includes work hours, availability, communication, and performance metrics.
  5. Monitor and Evaluate: Keep an eye on how well flexible working is going. Get feedback from employees and tweak things as needed to make it better.

Should a Four-Day Week Be Considered?

A four-day workweek is becoming popular as companies look to boost work-life balance and productivity. Here’s how it stacks up for the pharmaceutical industry:

Pros:

  • Enhanced Focus and Productivity: Shorter weeks can mean better focus and less burnout.
  • Attracting Talent: A four-day week is a great perk, helping you attract and keep top talent.
  • Reduced Operational Costs: Fewer workdays can cut down on utilities and other costs.

Cons:

  • Potential for Increased Workload: Employees might feel pressured to cram the same work into fewer days.
  • Scheduling Challenges: Coordinating meetings and deadlines in a shorter week can be tricky.
  • Impact on Client Services: Keeping up with client needs and project timelines could get tougher.

Should We Go Fully Remote, Hybrid, or Office-Based?

Choosing the right working model is key. Here’s a look at the pros and cons of each:

Fully Remote:

  • Pros: Maximum flexibility, lower overhead costs, and higher job satisfaction.
  • Cons: Challenges with collaboration and maintaining company culture. Some roles, like lab work, can’t be done remotely.

Hybrid:

  • Pros: Best of both worlds—flexibility with some in-office time for face-to-face interaction.
  • Cons: Requires careful planning to ensure smooth transitions. Can lead to inconsistent team dynamics.

Office-Based:

  • Pros: Easy collaboration and access to on-site resources. Great for spontaneous discussions and team building.
  • Cons: Less flexibility and higher operational costs. Might not attract those seeking better work-life balance.

What is the Ratio of Home, Hybrid, Office Within Pharma?

Pharma is leaning towards hybrid models, with many companies adopting a mix of home and office work. The exact split varies, but hybrid setups are the most common as they offer a good balance of flexibility and collaboration.

Case Studies in the Pharmaceutical Industry about Flex Work Models

AstraZeneca uses a hybrid model, with employees working both from home and the office. This setup has boosted productivity and employee satisfaction. They’ve invested in digital tools to support remote work and set clear guidelines for effective communication.

GSK: Offers various flexible working options, including remote work, flexible hours, and part-time roles. These arrangements have increased employee engagement and reduced turnover. They also provide robust training for managers to handle remote teams effectively.

Novartis: Has a “Choice with Responsibility” policy, letting employees choose their work arrangements while meeting their responsibilities. This has created a culture of trust and accountability, leading to more innovation and collaboration.

Other Case Studies

Pharmaceutical organisations like MSD, Medtronic, Roche, Novartis, and UCB have been at the forefront of implementing effective hybrid working practices even before the pandemic. These companies operate as matrix organisations, with cross-functional and project-based teams rather than permanent teams.

Key takeaways from their experience:

  • Clear Framework: It’s essential to establish a clear framework for remote work. This includes defining rules (such as minimum or maximum days for working from home) that everyone can align with. Communicating this framework creatively, such as through podcasts or webinars, helps ensure consistency.
  • Balancing Management Styles: Managers need to strike a balance between nurturing team members (checking in on well-being) and focusing on output (deliverables). Adopting management by outcome—setting clear objectives and empowering individuals with autonomy—can lead to sustained success.

Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) – Sustained Implementation of Hybrid Working

  • The RPS developed a robust hybrid working strategy with the help of experts. Their step-by-step roadmap facilitated a smooth transition from the concept of hybrid working to its sustained implementation.

Flexible and Hybrid Working Practices: Case Studies by CIPD

  • The CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) explores various aspects of flexible and hybrid working through case studies. These include transitioning to new ways of working, stakeholder engagement, technology adoption, managing hybrid teams, maintaining relationships, supporting well-being, and focusing on performance outcomes.

These case studies provide valuable insights into how pharmaceutical organisations have successfully embraced hybrid working models.

What next with Flex Work?

Pharma faces unique challenges and opportunities with flexible working. By understanding different models and implementing best practices, companies can create a work environment that supports both business goals and employee well-being. Whether it’s a four-day week, a hybrid model, or balancing remote and office work, the key is to stay flexible and responsive to the needs of the workforce.

In the end, flexible working isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution. Each pharma company needs to figure out what works best for them. By doing so, they can boost productivity, attract top talent, and ensure their employees are happy and healthy, driving the industry forward in a changing world.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Please visit our website to see more of our knowledge hub: https://refind.co.uk/

Women Leading the Way in Aviation

In the typically male-dominated world of aviation, women have often been left on the sidelines. But as the industry grows, especially in emerging markets, there’s a noticeable increase in female pilots, engineers, and executives who are reshaping the sector.

My blog looks at how these trailblazing women are key to its future.

How did we get here?

The male dominance in aviation is like many other technical and engineering fields. Historically it stems from a mix of societal norms, educational opportunities, and professional barriers that were skewed against women. Here’s a rundown of the main reasons why aviation has traditionally been a boys’ club:

  • Historical Norms and Perceptions: Back in the day, jobs that involved physical labour, machinery, and tech were seen as no-go areas for women. This was thanks to outdated gender stereotypes. Aviation, mixing mechanical engineering with hefty physical demands, especially in the early days, was no exception.
  • Educational Barriers: For a big chunk of the 20th century, women often had limited access to the science and tech education needed for a career in aviation. These educational paths were pretty much designed for and marketed to men, creating a hefty barrier to entry for women.
  • Legal and Institutional Restrictions: In many places, women were legally barred from certain jobs or working conditions. For instance, female pilots were often kept from flying commercial or military aircraft until well into the latter half of the 20th century.
  • Cultural Bias and Discrimination: Even when it was legal for women to join in, cultural biases often discouraged or outright excluded women from getting into or moving up in the field. This discrimination could come from within the industry through hiring practices, within training programmes, or socially through pressure and expectations about what jobs were ‘suitable’ for women.
  • Visibility and Role Models: A lack of female faces also keeps the cycle going where young women have fewer role models in the field. This lack of visibility can turn off interest and keep the gender imbalance going as fewer women enter the field, succeed, and act as role models for the next generation.
  • Work-Life Balance Challenges: Careers in aviation can involve weird hours, lots of travel, and long periods away from home, which can be extra tough for women who often take on bigger caregiving roles in their families.

How do we keep making aviation more inclusive?

To make sure the aviation industry becomes fully inclusive and keeps moving forward in gender diversity, we can take several proactive steps. These strategies focus on systemic change, education, policy implementation, and cultural shifts, and can be grouped into these subsections:

Education and Visibility:

Boost STEM Education for Girls: Encourage and support girls from a young age to explore science, tech, engineering, and maths (STEM) through school programmes, extracurricular activities, and community initiatives.

Scholarships and Financial Aid: Offer targeted scholarships and financial support for women entering aviation training programmes to help overcome financial barriers.

Spotlight on Success: Regularly highlight the achievements of women in aviation through media, seminars, and industry events to boost visibility and inspire the next generation.

Recruitment and Workplace Policies:

Inclusive Job Ads: Make sure job postings use welcoming language and clearly state that the organisation values diversity.

Diverse Hiring Panels: Use varied recruitment panels to help cut down on unconscious bias in the hiring process.

Flexible Work Options: Roll out flexible working hours and remote working options where possible to help employees manage work-life balance.

Fair Parental Leave: Offer fair parental leave for all parents, encouraging shared responsibilities at home and supporting women’s career continuity.

Professional Growth and Cultural Change:

Equal Opportunities for Advancement: Set clear, merit-based criteria for advancement to ensure women have the same chances to climb to senior roles.

Ongoing Training: Offer continuous training and professional development programmes to all employees, helping women gain the skills and qualifications needed to move up.

Anti-Discrimination Policies: Enforce strong policies against discrimination and harassment, with clear reporting mechanisms and consequences for misconduct.

Inclusive Culture Initiatives: Build an inclusive culture through workshops, training on unconscious bias, and regular chats on diversity and inclusion.

Industry-Wide and Community Initiatives:

Collaboration and Partnerships: Work with other companies, governments, and non-profit organisations to promote gender diversity across the industry.

Standards and Benchmarks: Set up and stick to industry-wide benchmarks for diversity and inclusion, with regular reporting and accountability.

Support Advocacy Groups: Partner with organisations that promote women in aviation, offering support through funding, resources, and joint initiatives.

Community Engagement: Get involved with local communities to educate and raise awareness about careers in aviation for women.

Breaking New Ground:

For years, the image of aviation professionals was pretty uniform—typically male. But this image is changing, especially in emerging markets like India, China, and parts of Africa, where more women are getting into aviation careers. Educational institutions and training programmes are pulling in more female talent, showing that the sector is ready to embrace diversity.

Empowering Change:

Several governments and aviation bodies in these markets are actively pushing for gender diversity. Initiatives like scholarships for female students, mentoring programmes tailored for women, and networking events are making a real difference. These efforts don’t just support individual women—they enrich the entire industry by bringing in new ideas and approaches.

Trailblazing Pilots:

The rise in the number of female pilots is one of the most visible signs of change. Women are now flying for both commercial giants and boutique carriers, and they’re doing so with exceptional skill and resilience. Their growing presence is not only inspiring but also crucial in breaking down outdated stereotypes.

Engineering the Future:

Beyond the cockpit, women are also leading innovations in aviation engineering and technology. From aerodynamic design to sustainability solutions, they are at the forefront of modern aviation challenges. Their contributions are vital in driving technological advancements and enhancing safety protocols across the industry.

Overcoming Challenges:

Despite these advances, women in aviation still face significant hurdles. Issues like gender bias, fewer opportunities for advancement compared to male counterparts, and the struggle to maintain work-life balance are still widespread. Addressing these challenges is essential for building a truly inclusive industry.

New Horizons:

An emerging topic of interest is the role of women in the development of sustainable aviation technologies. Now the industry focuses on reducing its environmental footprint. And female engineers and leaders are playing critical roles in crafting eco-friendly innovations.

Looking Ahead:

The future of aviation in emerging markets looks increasingly female. Encouraging inclusivity, diversity, and equality will unlock vast potential and drive significant growth within the industry. By supporting and promoting women in aviation, we can ensure a robust, dynamic, and equitable future.

The landscape of aviation across emerging markets is undergoing a profound transformation. Thanks to the relentless efforts of pioneering women, the industry is not only meeting the challenges of the 21st century but is poised to redefine what is possible. Their achievements pave the way for future generations, ensuring that the sky is no limit.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Please visit our website to see more of our knowledge hub: https://refind.co.uk/

Building Bridges: Innovative Solutions for Workplace Unity in Defence

Introduction

The defence industry, vital for national security, faces unique challenges in fostering cohesion and enhancing collaboration. These challenges, compounded by issues of gender representation and employee retention, warrant a closer examination to identify actionable improvements. This blog explores these issues and proposes solutions to ensure a more united and inclusive future in the defence sector.

Cohesion and Collaboration: Challenges and Solutions in the Defence Industry

The defence industry’s landscape is marked by varying levels of cohesion across different sectors.

For instance, the land systems sector exhibits a notable lack of collaboration. This often results in inefficiencies and a fragmented approach to project management and innovation. In contrast, the marine and submarine sectors demonstrate a more integrated approach. With entities actively communicating and supporting one another, particularly in redeployment scenarios.

To address these discrepancies, the industry could adopt some strategic approaches around its development of people.

Learning & Development:

  • Joint training programs. These should include personnel from different sectors of the defence industry can foster a sense of unity and understanding. These programmes can be designed to include team-building exercises. And cross-training on various technologies and operational tactics, which can build a more cohesive and adaptable workforce.
  • Inter-sector Mentorship Programs. Establishing mentorship programs that cross traditional sector boundaries within the defence industry can encourage the exchange of knowledge and experiences. Such programmes can pair up-and-coming professionals with seasoned experts in different fields. Promoting cross-pollination of ideas and strengthening the overall industry network.
  • Leadership Development Programs for Women: Create leadership development programs specifically tailored for women in the defence industry. These programs should focus on skill enhancement and leadership training. And providing networking opportunities that can help women advance to senior positions within their organisations.
  • Future-focused Training: Adapt training programs to not only meet current technological and strategic needs but also anticipate future developments. This approach ensures that the workforce remains capable and prepared to adopt modern technologies and methodologies swiftly.
  • Career Development Opportunities: Provide employees with clear career pathways and continuous learning opportunities. This could involve formal education programs and access to conferences and workshops. And, internal promotion opportunities that encourage employees to grow within the company.

Recruitment & Retention for the Defence Industry

  • Targeted Recruitment Campaigns: Focus on attracting more women into the industry through targeted recruitment campaigns that highlight the benefits and opportunities within the defence sector. These campaigns can include offering scholarships, creating internship opportunities, and forming partnerships with educational institutions that have strong female enrolments in relevant fields.
  • Retaining Talent: Strategies for a Robust Defence Workforce: Focus on developing a comprehensive strategy to retain the skilled and experienced workforce that is crucial for the defence industry’s success. This involves creating an attractive working environment and clear career progression paths.
  • Retention Strategies: Implement strategies aimed at improving retention rates, such as recognising and rewarding employee contributions, offering competitive benefits, and ensuring a supportive work environment that values and nurtures talent.
  • Competitive Compensation Packages: Ensure that compensation packages are competitive with the market to attract and retain top talent. This includes not only salaries but also benefits like health insurance, retirement plans, and performance bonuses.

Communication in the Defence Industry:

  • Standardisation of Communication Protocols: Implementing industry-wide standards for communication can help unify different sectors within the defence industry. By creating a common language and set of procedures for communication, organisations can reduce misunderstandings and delays, thereby enhancing operational efficiency and cooperation across various projects and teams.
  • Document Insights: LIOS: The Land Information Oriented Strategy (LIOS) document offers comprehensive recommendations that can guide the defence industry towards more streamlined and advanced practices. It emphasises the importance of integrating modern technologies and strategic approaches to meet current and future challenges.
  • Enhanced Data Sharing: Promote enhanced data sharing across organisations within the defence industry to avoid duplication of efforts and to streamline operations. This can involve developing secure, integrated platforms where information can be shared efficiently without compromising confidentiality or security.
  • Industry Stakeholders’ Engagement: Encourage industry stakeholders, including policymakers, private companies, and educational institutions, to take these recommendations seriously and collaborate on implementing them. This collective effort can significantly propel the industry forward with innovative and forward-thinking strategies.

Other Important Considerations

  • Improving Gender Representation: To address the current disparity in gender representation, the defence industry needs initiative-taking measures. With some companies only showing 21% female representation against a target of 30%, strategies such as awareness campaigns, dedicated recruitment drives, and highlighting role models are essential to inspire and attract more women to the industry.
  • Inclusive Workplace Policies: Develop workplace policies that cater to a diverse workforce by incorporating flexible working conditions, comprehensive maternity and paternity leave, and support for work-life balance. These policies should also address any unconscious biases and promote an inclusive culture that values all employees equally.
  • Work-Life Balance Initiatives: Introduce flexible working hours and remote work options where feasible to improve job satisfaction and accommodate the diverse needs of the workforce. These initiatives can help maintain a balanced and motivated workforce, which is essential for long-term retention and productivity.

Call to Action

Industry leaders, policymakers, and all stakeholders are encouraged to engage with these issues actively. By working together and embracing change, we can ensure a robust defence sector that is ready to face the challenges of tomorrow. The defence industry stands at a pivotal juncture, where fostering cohesion, enhancing gender representation, and retaining talent are not just beneficial but necessary for its sustained success and relevance. By embracing these challenges as opportunities for growth and transformation, the industry can look forward to a more integrated, inclusive, and innovative future.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Please visit our website to see more of our knowledge hub: https://refind.co.uk/

Emerging Markets within the Aviation Industry

Diving into the aviation industry within emerging markets. This is a bit like embarking on an exhilarating journey to an unknown destination. It’s full of potential but not without its fair share of turbulence. Especially when it comes to the all-important aspect of finding and hiring the right crew to navigate these skies. So, let’s have a natter about the challenges organisations face and the savvy ways they’re overcoming them, shall we?

The Talent Turbulence

Imagine you’re at the helm of an aviation company looking to expand into, say, Southeast Asia or Africa. The view from the cockpit is promising. There is rising demand for air travel and burgeoning middle classes with disposable income. And, less saturated skies than in the West.

But there’s a catch. Where do you find skilled professionals to fly your planes, manage your operations, and maintain your fleet?

The first hurdle is the sheer shortage of qualified personnel. Aviation requires an extremely specific set of skills. From, pilots trained in the right aircraft types to engineers and safety inspectors who know their stuff inside out. In emerging markets, where the aviation sector is just… well, emerging, there might not be a deep pool of local talent to dip into.

Then there’s the issue of regulations and standards. Each country has its own rules of the air, and navigating these can be as tricky as a night landing in fog. Training staff to meet both local and international safety standards is a task that’s both critical and costly.

Having the right Leadership

Ah, the power of a strong senior leadership team in the aviation industry, especially when venturing into the bustling skies of emerging markets, cannot be overstated. It’s like having an experienced pilot and co-pilot in the cockpit during a particularly tricky landing; their expertise, foresight, and ability to navigate through turbulence are invaluable. Let’s delve into why the right leadership team is critical for steering through the unique challenges and opportunities these markets present.

1. Navigating through Turbulence

First off, emerging markets are a mixed bag of incredible opportunities tempered by equally daunting challenges. From fluctuating economic conditions and regulatory landscapes to cultural nuances and infrastructure gaps, the terrain is tricky. A seasoned leadership team brings a wealth of experience and a steady hand to the controls, guiding the organisation through these uncertainties with strategic decision-making and risk management.

2. Setting the Course

A robust senior leadership team sets the strategic direction for the company. They’re the ones charting the course, making pivotal decisions on which markets to enter, the scale of operations, and how to differentiate from competitors already circling these new territories. Their vision for growth in these markets is not just about expanding the route map but ensuring sustainable operations that adapt to local needs and regulations.

3. Building Local Alliances

One of the keys to success in emerging markets is understanding and integrating into the local culture and business landscape. Effective senior leaders know the importance of building strong relationships with local partners, authorities, and other stakeholders. They are adept at negotiating partnerships or joint ventures that can ease the entry and expansion process, ensuring that the company’s operations are both compliant and culturally sensitive.

4. Talent Navigation

As we’ve touched on before, finding and nurturing the right talent is a significant hurdle in emerging markets. A forward-thinking leadership team recognises the need for investing in local talent development and creating a work culture that attracts the best in the field. They champion initiatives like training programs, leadership development, and career progression opportunities that not only fill the immediate talent gap but also build a loyal and skilled workforce for the future.

Leveraging Technology and Innovation

The aviation industry is on the cusp of digital transformation, from how airlines operate to how they engage with customers. Leaders who are tech-savvy and open to innovation can drive the adoption of new technologies to improve efficiency, safety, and customer experience. In emerging markets, where technological leaps can sometimes outpace more established markets, this openness to innovation can be a significant advantage.

Navigating the Talent Clouds

How are companies managing to recruit and retain the right talent, then? They’re getting creative – and strategic.

Take Emirates, for example. Recognising the need to prepare for future growth, they confronted a problem head-on and established the Emirates Flight Training Academy in Dubai. This state-of-the-art facility isn’t about nurturing home-grown talent; it’s a magnet for aspiring pilots from across the globe.

The academy offers an integrated training programme, combining classroom learning with hands-on experience in modern training aircraft. But here’s the clincher: by investing in training and development, Emirates isn’t just filling the current talent gap. They’re building a pipeline of skilled professionals ready to take the industry to new heights.

Other Turbulences

But it’s not all smooth flying. Beyond the challenge of finding and hiring talent, there’s the issue of infrastructure. Many emerging markets are playing catch-up when it comes to airport facilities, air traffic control systems, and maintenance capabilities. Then there’s the volatile nature of fuel prices and currency fluctuations, which can throw a spanner in the works of the best-laid plans.

What Have We Learned?

Embarking on the adventure of expanding into emerging aviation markets is not for the faint-hearted. The talent challenge is real, but as our case study of Emirates shows, it’s not insurmountable. It requires a blend of innovation, investment in training, and a long-term vision.

The lessons here? First, that building a skilled workforce from the ground up can not only solve the immediate talent shortage but also contribute to the sustainable growth of the aviation sector in these markets. Second, that the journey into emerging markets is as much about navigating local regulations and infrastructure challenges as it is about strategic recruitment and training.

In essence, while the skies over emerging markets may be less crowded, the route to success is filled with its own unique set of obstacles. But for those willing to invest in their crew and innovate their approach, the potential rewards are sky-high. So, here’s to the brave aviators charting their course into new territories – may your ventures be as thrilling as they are prosperous!

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Please visit our website to see more of our knowledge hub: https://refind.co.uk/

How to have Productive Leadership Meetings

Productive leadership meetings are the linchpin of organisational success. To help you plan for that success, we delve into the nuances of how to have productive leadership meetings, and exploring strategies to enhance collaboration, decision-making, and overall team productivity.

Setting the Stage for Success: Planning and Preparation

Successful leadership meetings start with meticulous planning and preparation. As part of that preparation, it is important to ensure that the agenda is clear, concise, and aligned with the overarching goals of the organisation.

A well-structured agenda ensures that the meeting stays focused on crucial topics, enhancing the chances of productive discussions.

Engaging Leadership: Fostering Participation and Inclusivity

The meetings are not one-sided conversations. Encouraging active participation from all team members fosters a culture of inclusivity and collaboration.

Encouraging Participation for Success

Leaders should create an environment where team members feel comfortable expressing their opinions and ideas, contributing to a diverse range of perspectives.

Utilising Technology for Seamless Collaboration

Technology plays a pivotal role in fostering seamless collaboration during meetings. So think about technologies such as video conferencing tools, collaborative platforms, and real-time document sharing enhance communication and decision-making.

Effective Decision-Making: From Discussion to Action

It’s not just about talking; it’s about making decisions that drive the organisation forward. A structured decision-making process ensures that outcomes are clear, actionable, and aligned with strategic goals.

Decisive Leadership: Turning Discussions into Actionable Outcomes

Leaders should guide the team through a logical decision-making process, considering all relevant factors and ensuring that decisions are communicated effectively.

Time Management

In the fast-paced business environment, time is a precious commodity. Successful leadership meetings are well-paced, ensuring that discussions are thorough without unnecessary delays.

Leaders should be mindful of the agenda, allocate time effectively, and keep the meeting on track to respect everyone’s time.

Encouraging Innovation: Creating a Culture of Creative Exchange

Leadership meetings provide a platform for fostering innovation and creative thinking. Encouraging team members to share innovative ideas contributes to continuous improvement and adaptability.

Building Relationships: The Human Element

Beyond the business agenda, successful leadership meetings recognise the importance of building strong interpersonal relationships. Team-building exercises, casual conversations, and acknowledging achievements contribute to a positive team dynamic.

Relationship-Driven Leadership: Nurturing Bonds in Meetings

Leaders should invest time in cultivating a positive team culture, promoting camaraderie and mutual respect.

Continuous Improvement: Learning from Past Meetings

Post-meeting evaluations are crucial for ongoing success. Leaders should gather feedback, assess what worked well and what can be improved, and implement changes for future meetings.

Key Phrase: Evolving Leadership Meetings: The Power of Continuous Improvement

Related Blog: How to Conduct Effective Post-Meeting Evaluations

Overcoming Challenges: Common Hurdles in Leadership Meetings

By addressing common issues such as lack of engagement, conflicting opinions, or technology glitches, you will be showing proactive leadership and effective problem-solving.

Leaders should be prepared to address challenges promptly, maintaining the flow and productivity of the meeting.

Remote Leadership Meetings: Bridging the Distance Effectively

In an increasingly remote working landscape, leadership meetings often take place virtually. Leaders must adapt their strategies to ensure that remote meetings are as effective as those held in person.

Conclusion: A Blueprint for Success in Leadership Meetings

Our conclusion? Successful leadership meetings are a strategic imperative for organisational growth and cohesion. By meticulously planning agendas, fostering participation, leveraging technology, making informed decisions, and continuously improving, leaders can transform meetings into powerful drivers of success.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

The Surge in Candidate Ghosting

In the ever-changing realm of recruitment, an alarming trend is gaining pace– the ghosting of candidates. This blog aims to clarify the concept of ghosting in the hiring process, investigate the reasons behind its growing prevalence, and examine the impacts it has on candidates and companies alike. Let’s delve into why taking part in this practice is counterproductive and explore strategies to foster better communication during the hiring journey.

What Do We Mean by Ghosting?

Unravelling the Enigma:

Ghosting in the context of recruitment refers to the abrupt and unexplained end of communication between employers or recruiters and job candidates. It’s akin to submitting your resume into a void, never to receive updates, feedback, or closure regarding your application.

The Silent Treatment:

Candidates who experience ghosting are left in the dark, unsure of their application status or whether the position has been filled. This lack of communication causes frustration and uncertainty, tarnishing the candidate’s view of the company and the recruitment process.

Why is Ghosting on the Rise?

Digital Disconnection:

With the digital age revolutionisng the hiring process, it has also created impersonal communication. With the ease of online applications and auto systems, the personal touch in candidate communication often takes a back seat.

Increased Competition:

In today’s fiercely competitive job market, employers may be inundated with a high volume of applications for a single position. The sheer number of candidates can make it hard for recruiters to respond separately, adding to ghosting as a coping mechanism.

Time Constraints:

Recruiters often face tight schedules and competing priorities. In the rush to fill positions quickly, the human side of recruitment can be overshadowed, contributing to the prevalence of ghosting.

Impacts of Ghosting:

Ghosting Causes Candidate Fallout:

Ghosting profoundly affects job candidates. The uncertainty and lack of closure can lead to feelings of rejection, frustration, and a diminished perception of the hiring company. This negative experience may influence the candidate’s decision to engage with the company in the future or recommend it to others.

Damaged Employer Brand:

The practice of ghosting doesn’t just affect candidates; it tarnishes the reputation of the hiring organisation. A poor candidate experience can be shared online, dissuading potential applicants and damaging the employer brand.

Missed Opportunities from Ghosting:

By ghosting candidates, employers may miss out on potential talent. That could mean a candidate who feels valued and respected during the recruitment process is more likely to become a committed and engaged employee.

Negative Impact on Employee Morale:

Existing employees who witness or hear about the ghosting of candidates may experience a decline in morale. This can erode trust in leadership and the company’s commitment to treating individuals with respect.

Breaking the Silence: A Better Approach

Transparent Communication:

The antidote to ghosting is transparent communication. Keep candidates informed about the status of their application, whether positive or negative. Establish clear communication channels to manage expectations and provide regular updates.

Personalised Feedback:

Offering constructive feedback, even in rejection, demonstrates respect for the candidate’s time and effort. Providing insights into the decision-making process can help candidates understand areas for improvement.

Utilise Technology Wisely:

While technology can streamline recruitment processes, it should enhance, not replace, human interaction. Leverage automation for administrative tasks, but ensure that there are mechanisms in place for meaningful, personalised communication.

Conclusion:

Ghosting candidates is a detrimental practice that adversely affects both individuals seeking employment and the organisations conducting the hiring. As responsible recruiters and employers, it’s essential to recognise the impacts of ghosting and commit to fostering a culture of open, respectful communication.

By embracing transparency, providing feedback, and utilising technology judiciously, we can collectively contribute to a more positive and constructive recruitment experience for everyone involved. It’s time to break the silence, bridge the communication gap, and build stronger connections in the world of hiring.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

How to Prepare for a Senior Leadership Interview

If you’ve ever aspired to climb the corporate ladder and secure a senior leadership role, you’ll know that the journey isn’t just about meeting the qualifications on paper. It also involves acing the interview that can make or break your career. The process of preparing for a senior leadership role interview requires meticulous planning, self-assessment, and a clear understanding of what’s expected from you in such a high-stakes situation. In this blog, we’ll delve into the intricacies of interview preparation, offering guidance on how to excel and secure your dream leadership position.

The Importance of Preparation

Why Preparation Helps

A key part of the preparation process is understanding why it’s so crucial. Adequate preparation not only boosts your confidence but also demonstrates your commitment to the role. When you enter the interview room well-prepared, you send a clear message to the interviewers that you’re serious about the position and have the skills necessary to excel in it.

Internalise the Job Description

One of the first steps in your interview preparation journey is to thoroughly understand the job description. Ensure that you can align your skills, experience, and personal attributes with the specific requirements of the role. By doing so, you’ll be better equipped to showcase how you are the perfect fit for the job.

Research the Company

Studying the company’s history, culture, and recent achievements is another vital aspect of preparation. Demonstrating knowledge about the company and its values will highlight your genuine interest and commitment.

How to Prepare

Now that you understand the importance of preparation, let’s move on to the “how.” Effective preparation for a senior leadership role interview involves several key steps:

Self-Reflection

Before diving into the interview preparation process, take a moment to reflect on your career journey and your personal leadership style. What are your strengths, weaknesses, and values? Understanding yourself is essential to articulating your unique leadership approach during the interview.

Set Clear Objectives

Define your goals for the interview. What impression do you want to leave on the interviewers? What key points do you want to emphasise? Setting clear objectives will help you stay focused during the interview.

Practice, Practice, Practice

One of the most effective ways to prepare is by practicing your responses to potential interview questions. Seek out a trusted friend or colleague who can conduct a mock interview, providing you with valuable feedback.

Dress the Part

Don’t underestimate the power of appearance. Ensure you dress professionally and appropriately for the position you’re interviewing for. First impressions matter, and dressing the part is a step toward making a strong initial impact.

Ways of Preparing

While there are several ways to prepare for a senior leadership role interview, it’s essential to choose the methods that work best for you. Here are some common approaches:

Online Resources

Numerous online resources offer valuable insights into interview preparation. Websites like Indeed, LinkedIn, and Glassdoor provide information on common leadership interview questions and tips on how to answer them.

Books

Consider reading books on leadership and interview techniques. “The Art of Possibility” by Rosamund Stone Zander and Benjamin Zander and “Leaders Eat Last” by Simon Sinek are great options to expand your leadership knowledge.

Professional Coaching

If you’re seeking personalised guidance, you might benefit from hiring a professional interview coach. They can provide targeted feedback and help you refine your interview skills.

Examples of Leadership Interview Questions

In any interview, you should be prepared to answer a variety of questions. For a senior leadership role interview, questions may revolve around your experience, leadership style, and decision-making abilities. Here are some common examples:

  1. Tell us about your leadership experience.
  2. How do you handle conflict within your team?
  3. Describe a challenging decision you’ve made and its outcome?
  4. What is your vision for the company, and how will you implement it?

It’s essential to anticipate these questions and formulate thoughtful, concise responses that highlight your qualifications and suitability for the role.

How to Give the Best Answers

Nailing the interview isn’t just about what questions you’re asked; it’s also about how you answer them. Here are some tips for providing the best responses:

STAR Method

When answering behavioral questions, consider using the STAR method:

  • Situation: Describe the context or situation.
  • Task: Explain the specific task or challenge you faced.
  • Action: Describe the actions you took.
  • Result: Share the outcomes and results of your actions.

This structured approach helps you provide comprehensive answers.

Be Specific

Use concrete examples from your past experiences to support your claims. Specifics make your answers more convincing and memorable.

Stay Positive

Even when discussing challenges or failures, maintain a positive tone. Emphasise what you learned from those experiences and how they’ve made you a stronger leader.

What If You Struggle with Questions?

Interviews can be nerve-wracking, and it’s not uncommon to struggle with certain questions. Here’s what to do if you find yourself stumped:

Pause and Think

Don’t rush to answer a question. Take a moment to collect your thoughts and structure your response. A brief pause is much better than an incomplete or unclear answer.

Seek Clarification

If you don’t fully understand a question, don’t hesitate to ask for clarification. It’s better to ensure you’re answering the right question than to give an off-topic response.

Practice Active Listening

Active listening during the interview is crucial. Make sure you fully understand the question before you respond. If you’re unsure, repeat the question or ask for confirmation.

How to Stand Out

To stand out in a senior leadership role interview, you need to leave a lasting impression. Here are some strategies to help you shine:

Share Unique Insights

Offer fresh, original perspectives on industry trends, challenges, and opportunities. Interviewers appreciate candidates who bring innovative ideas to the table.

Emphasise Cultural Fit

Highlight your alignment with the company’s culture and values. Showcase your ability to seamlessly integrate into the existing team.

Showcase Emotional Intelligence

Demonstrate your emotional intelligence by showing empathy, self-awareness, and the ability to build strong relationships. These soft skills are highly valued in leadership positions.

Tips for Success

Achieving success in interviews involves a combination of factors. Here are some additional tips to ensure you make the most of your opportunity:

Confidence and Humility

Strike a balance between confidence and humility. You should exude confidence in your abilities while remaining open to learning and collaboration.

Elevator Pitch

Prepare a concise and compelling elevator pitch that highlights your strengths, values, and what sets you apart as a leader.

Ask Questions

Towards the end of the interview, be prepared to ask insightful questions about the role and the company. This shows your genuine interest and engagement.

Staying Calm Under Pressure

Maintaining composure during a senior leadership role interview can be challenging. Here’s how to stay calm under pressure:

Practice Relaxation Techniques

Before the interview, engage in relaxation techniques like deep breathing and visualisation to calm your nerves.

Mindfulness

Practice mindfulness to stay present during the interview. Focus on the questions and your responses without getting overwhelmed by anxiety.

Positive Self-Talk

Replace negative self-talk with positive affirmations. Remind yourself of your qualifications and your value to the organisation.

Correcting Errors or Answers

If you make a mistake or feel you could have answered a question better, don’t be afraid to correct it:

Acknowledge the Mistake

If you recognise an error in your response, acknowledge it and clarify your intended answer.

Maintain Confidence

Correcting an answer doesn’t have to diminish your confidence. It can actually demonstrate your commitment to providing accurate and well-thought-out responses.

Learn from Mistakes

View any errors as learning opportunities. Use them to refine your interview skills and improve for future interviews.

In conclusion, preparing for a senior leadership role interview is a multi-faceted process that demands dedication and self-reflection. By understanding the importance of preparation, learning how to prepare effectively, and mastering the art of answering interview questions, you can increase your chances of securing your desired leadership position. Remember, success in interviews is not just about showcasing your qualifications but also about demonstrating your leadership potential and your ability to thrive in a senior role. With these tips and strategies, you can confidently embark on your journey to becoming a senior leader in your organisation. Good luck!

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

New Year, New Me? New Year Resolutions for Businesses

The start of a new year often heralds a period of reflection and reinvention, and New Years Resolutions.

For individuals, this might translate into personal commitments and aspirations. However, businesses are not exempt from this ritual. In fact, as the calendar year nears its end, many companies are already asking, “New Year, New Me?”.

Here we delve into the trend of businesses making New Years Resolutions:

The Tradition of New Year Resolutions

Historically, New Year’s resolutions date back to the Babylonians, who made promises to their gods at the start of each year. These promises often revolved around returning borrowed items and paying off debts. In today’s age, tradition has evolved but the essence remains: setting goals for positive change.

Why Businesses Can’t Ignore New Year Resolutions

Just as individuals pledge to eat healthier or read more books, companies might decide to enhance customer relations, increase profitability, or launch a new product line. The principle remains the same: improvement and progress.

  1. Growth and Expansion: For businesses looking to scale, the new year could mark the beginning of tapping into new markets, exploring diverse product lines, or even mergers and acquisitions.
  2. Strengthening Customer Relations: Modern businesses understand the importance of a loyal customer base. Thus, the new year is an opportunity to roll out loyalty programmes, enhance customer service, or introduce community engagement initiatives.
  3. Sustainability: With rising awareness about environmental issues, many businesses are opting for sustainable practices. Come 2024, we could see more firms vowing to reduce their carbon footprint or eliminate plastic from their operations.

Planning is Key

The allure of the New Year is strong, but successful resolutions are built on foresight and preparation. Here’s why and how businesses should start planning their resolutions well in advance:

  1. Market Analysis: Before setting any goals, businesses need to have their fingers on the pulse of the market. Understanding evolving consumer behaviours, emerging trends, and potential disruptors can guide goal setting.
  2. Feedback Integration: End-of-year feedback from clients, stakeholders, and employees can provide invaluable insights. Harnessing this information can shape the resolutions for the coming year.
  3. Resource Allocation: Whether it’s hiring new talent, purchasing equipment, or investing in training, businesses need to ensure they have the necessary resources to fulfil their resolutions.

Personal Resolutions Within a Professional Framework

New Year’s resolutions aren’t exclusive to business entities. Employees, irrespective of their designation or role, can draft their own set of professional resolutions. By aligning personal goals with organisational objectives, employees can find a harmonious blend of personal and professional growth.

  1. Skill Development: With industries constantly evolving, employees might resolve to learn a new skill, attend workshops, or pursue further education.
  2. Networking: Building a robust professional network can open doors to opportunities. Attending more industry events or joining professional organisations might be on the cards for many.
  3. Wellness and Work-life Balance: Burnout is a real concern. Employees could aim for a healthier work-life balance, integrating wellness routines into their daily life.

Case Studies: Resolutions That Transformed Businesses

Let’s delve into some real-life examples where resolutions have made a noticeable difference:

  1. Company A’s Green Pledge: Starting 2022, Company A, a renowned beverage manufacturer, pledged to go plastic-free. Through extensive planning in 2021, they rolled out glass bottles in 2022. Not only did this move enhance their brand image, but it also led to increased sales.
  2. Company B’s Focus on Mental Health: Recognising the rising concerns around mental health, Company B, a tech giant, introduced mandatory wellness breaks and counselling sessions for employees in 2023. This boosted employee morale, reduced sick leaves, and enhanced overall productivity.

In Conclusion

New Year’s resolutions for businesses aren’t just a trend. They’re an essential introspection tool, guiding companies towards sustainable growth. While 2024 awaits with its set of challenges and opportunities, preparedness, backed by resolutions, can set the stage for a prosperous year ahead.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe
that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term
partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients,
providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best
talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique
and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment.
That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the
specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a
full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service.
As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your
organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and
experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework
please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

How does the way we recruit help with retention?

In today’s job market, where options abound, holding onto your top talent can seem like a tricky game. However, there’s a secret many successful companies already know; retention starts at recruitment. It’s not just about hiring the right people; it’s about keeping them. Let’s delve into how early engagement strategies can boost long-term employee loyalty and what you can do to stand out from the crowd.

1. First impressions matter

When potential employees come for an interview, they assess your company just as much as you’re assessing them. Make that first interaction shine. Offer a friendly greeting, respect their time, and provide them with all the details they need. This is your chance to show them why they’d want to work for you.

2. Stand out from other employers

To attract and retain top talent, you need to offer something different. Maybe it’s a unique work culture, flexible working hours, or outstanding training programmes. By highlighting what makes your company unique during the recruitment process, you appeal to candidates looking for a long-term home. This helps with retention.

3. Foster open communication

From the word go, be transparent. Discuss roles, expectations, and growth opportunities upfront. This early trust-building sets a strong foundation for a long-lasting relationship and supports with retention.

4. Use Performance Reviews constructively

Performance reviews aren’t just for feedback; they’re a chance to re-engage employees. Use these sessions to discuss career paths, training opportunities, and address any concerns. When employees feel listened to and see growth potential, they’re more likely to stay.

5. Succession Planning is key to help with retention

Every employee, from entry-level to management, should know there’s a path upwards. Succession planning is more than just filling roles; it’s about grooming your employees for future leadership positions. This not only ensures continuity for the business but also gives employees a vision of their future within the company.

6. Early inclusion builds loyalty

Help your new hires to quickly feel a part of the team. An assigned mentor, team lunches, and consistent check-ins during their early days can make all the difference. A sense of belonging is crucial for long-term loyalty and retention.

7. Offer competitive Benefits

While a good salary is essential, the benefits package can be a real deal-breaker. Whether it’s health insurance, gym memberships, or work-from-home options, showcasing these benefits early on can sway a potential recruit’s decision.

8. Keep the dialogue going

Feedback isn’t a one-off. Encourage an open-door policy where employees can share their thoughts anytime. This continuous dialogue ensures any issues are addressed promptly, and employees feel valued.

In Conclusion

In the race to retain top talent, starting early is the key. By focusing on recruitment as the first step to retention, companies can build long-lasting, loyal relationships with their employees. After all, when employees feel valued, recognised, and see a future in a company, they’re more likely to stay.

Stay tuned for more insights on recruitment, retention, and building a loyal workforce on our blogs.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.

Choosing the Right Candidate for Your Company

Choosing the right candidate for your company is an art and a science. It’s about understanding the specific needs of your business and merging them with the right human qualities. And so, this guide provides us with some knowledge to make well-informed choices, ensuring that your selected candidate is not only qualified but is also a genuine asset.

1. Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion

It’s paramount to cultivate a diverse and inclusive workforce, which reflects varied experiences and perspectives. By focusing on:

  • Equality: Ensure equal opportunity for all applicants, irrespective of their background.
  • Diversity: Embrace candidates with different life experiences, cultures, and viewpoints.
  • Inclusion: Make certain all employees feel valued and included.
  • Unconscious bias: Train your team to recognise and avoid unintentional prejudices that may affect hiring decisions.

2. Fit for the Current Team

A candidate could appear great on paper, but it’s crucial that they get along with the existing team. With that in mind, how do we ensure we are choosing the right candidate for your company?

  • Company culture: Will the candidate thrive in the company’s current cultural environment?
  • Team dynamics: Consider team compatibility, ensuring a harmonious blend of personalities.

3. Fairness in Recruitment

A just recruitment process is key to ensuring every candidate gets a fair chance:

  • Use structured interviews with consistent questions for all.
  • Establish a clear criterion to evaluate each applicant.
  • Ensure multiple stakeholders are involved in the decision-making.

4. A Robust Recruitment Process

A systematic recruitment process guarantees efficiency with choosing the right candidate for your company:

  • Job description clarity: Detail the required skills, roles, and responsibilities.
  • Multiple interview stages: One way of helping is to incorporate methods such as panel interviews, practical tests, or group exercises (but obviously not being too long winded or over the top) which then in turn helps with the selection process.

5. Utilising Headhunters or Recruitment Companies

Considering professionals can save you time and yield better results:

  • They have a vast network of candidates.
  • They can pre-screen candidates, ensuring only the best reach you.
  • They can offer industry insights and salary benchmarking.

6. Researching and Interviewing the Candidate

Thorough research and well-structured interviews yield fruitful outcomes:

  • Social media checks: LinkedIn will offer insights into their professional history.
  • Right questions: Ask situational questions to gauge their problem-solving skills.
  • Ask for examples: Let candidates show their achievements with real-life situations they’ve handled.

7. Recognising Transferable Skills and Trainability

Not all skills are listed on a CV, and some can be developed with ease:

  • Transferable skills: Attributes like problem-solving, team management, and communication often transfer across industries.
  • Trainability: Some technical skills can be taught. Gauge a candidate’s willingness and capacity to learn new things.

Conclusion

Choosing the right candidate is a blend of understanding your company’s needs, ensuring a fair and inclusive process, and recognising the potential in individuals. By adhering to these principles, you’re setting your business up for a brighter future filled with dedicated, diverse, and skilled professionals.

OUR FOCUS ON LONG-TERM PARTNERSHIPS

At re:find we have been in Executive Search for over 20 years. We believe that recruitment is not a one-off transaction but rather a long-term partnership. We aim to build long-term relationships with our clients, providing ongoing support and advice to help them find and retain the best talent for their organisation.

In addition, as a business, we understand that every organisation is unique and that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to recruitment. That’s why we offer bespoke recruitment solutions that are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether you need help with a single hire or a full recruitment campaign, we can help.

We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality service. As part of this, we ensure that we take the time to understand your organisation’s culture and values, as well as the specific skills and experience needed for each role.

For more information on our executive search practice and our CCS framework please get in touch with our Managing Director, James Cumming.